Lifestyle Choices Have a Big Impact on High Blood Pressure, Study Confirms

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Playing football found to be the best way for men to improve overall fitness, normalise blood pressure levels and reduce the risk of stroke, but any other exercise will help too, say Hypnotension creators

Although exercise is only one of the many factors affecting blood pressure, in our experience it is one of the most reliable. It doesn't have to be football though, it can be any aerobic exercise which leaves you slightly breathless

Scientists from the Universities of Exeter and Copenhagen, and Gentofte University Hospital in Denmark have released a landmark study showing that playing football was the best way for men to improve overall fitness, normalise blood pressure levels and reduce the risk of stroke.

The scientists found that those men who trained for and played football received greater health benefits than those who did just about any other sport.

The research team chose 33 men between the ages of 33 and 54, all of whom had mild to moderate hypertension. The study showed that after six months of football training, three out of four men had blood pressure levels in the normal, healthy range.

Scientists have suspected for some time that rigorous physical activity can lead a decrease in the risk for high blood pressure as well as bringing down existing high blood pressure.

Often, this consistent physical activity is much more effective for long term control than the treatments given by their doctors and it points out something many have known for some time; patients need to take control of their own lives to prevent high blood pressure.

Making simple changes like increasing the level of physical activity made a world of difference and everyone has the power to make that change.

One of the best ways for anyone to take control and lower their blood pressure is through the Hypnotension programme. This innovative programme takes into account all of the lifestyle factors that lead to high blood pressure, including lack of physical activity.

There are many lifestyle factors which can affect blood pressure. These include too much salt and alcohol, being overweight, lack of exercise, eating an unhealthy diet, ineffectively managing stress and over reliance on certain medications.

The Hypnotension programme recognises that high blood pressure is caused by a series of factors and that certain factors play a greater role than others in some people.

The Hypnotension programme takes all these factors into consideration and leads to the development of unique plans for each individual to address the specific factors that are leading to high blood pressure.

For the developers on the Hypnotension programme, this new study only reinforces what they have known for years. They have often developed programs for individuals that needed to increase their level of physical activity and they have seen the results when these programs were implemented.

Many of the people who used the Hypnotension programme and increased their physical activity saw dramatic results in lowering their blood pressure. As Hypnotension co-founder Rob Woodgate put it, "Although exercise is only one of the many factors affecting blood pressure, in our experience it is one of the most reliable. It doesn't have to be football though, it can be any aerobic exercise which leaves you slightly breathless"

Ultimately, the responsibility for taking control of blood pressure rests with each patient. However, help available via a worldwide network of Hypnotension practitioners that have been specifically trained to look and deal appropriately with these factors.

Hypertension is one of the leading killers across the globe accounting for over 20% of all deaths worldwide. High blood pressure is responsible for 62% of strokes and 49% of all heart disease. With such high numbers it is imperative that those suffering from hypertension find the most effective ways to reduce their high blood pressure levels and the Hypnotension programme is a compelling answer.

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Paul Howard
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