Stevens Johnson Syndrome: a Life-Threatening Reaction to Medication

On October 3rd, 2012 the Chicago Tribune published that a young girl, Brianna Thompson, had an experimental eye treatment to treat her toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), a more severe form of Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Stevens Johnson Syndrome is a skin condition that also affects the mucus membranes and is most commonly caused by the use of certain medications. Stevens Johnson Syndrome can cause blindness and even death in some cases. In March and May 2011, the FDA announced that the adverse reactions section of labeling for Doryx, Vibramycin and Monodox to was updated to include Stevens Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Now, AttorneyOne.com, a recognized authority on law, can provide helpful, proven advice and simple solutions including how to get in contact with legal counsel so anyone can easily and inexpensively deal with severe cases of Stevens Johnson Syndrome. [http://www.attorneyone.com/stevens-johnson-syndrome/

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Stevens Johnson Syndrome: severe threat

Stevens Johnson Syndrome: severe threat

Stevens Johnson Syndrome can cause blindness and even death in some cases

San Diego, CA (PRWEB) October 30, 2012

The media spotlight is often a double-edged sword. No one knows this better than Brianna Thompson and people who suffer from Stevens Johnson Syndrome. And yet, gossip and rumor-mongering aside, the real story here is being overlooked according to Sean Burke of AttorneyOne.

On October 3rd, 2012 the Chicago Tribune published that a young girl, Brianna Thompson, had an experimental eye treatment to treat her toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), a more severe form of Stevens Johnson Syndrome. Stevens Johnson Syndrome is a skin condition that also affects the mucus membranes and is most commonly caused by the use of certain medications. Stevens Johnson Syndrome can cause blindness and even death in some cases.

When Brianna Thompson was 9 years old, three years ago, she suffered a widespread rash and bloodshot eyes after taking Tylenol. In her case acetaminophen, found in various over-the-counter medications like Tylenol, caused toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Brianna, after the experimental eye treatment, recovered from the disease.

In March and May 2011, the FDA announced that the adverse reactions section of labeling for Doryx, Vibramycin and Monodox to was updated to include Stevens Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis.

AttorneyOne.com, a recognized authority on law, can provide helpful advice and simple solutions including how to get in contact with legal counsel so that, in case of severe complications from Stevens Johnson Syndrome, someone can easily and inexpensively deal with it. As Mr. Burke, director of Media Relations for AttorneyOne.com, added, “What all this information really illustrates is that threat from Stevens Johnson Syndrome remains. For that reason, our focus should squarely fall on getting the word out and assisting people in finding the right legal assistance.”

According to Dermatology Online Journal, there are 1 to 3 cases per million people of Stevens Johnson syndrome, which has a mortality rate of 5%.

AttorneyOne.com has further information on Stevens Johnson Syndrome lawsuits including how to get in contact with legal counsel.

Headquartered in San Diego, CA Attorney One was founded in 2004 and is not a law firm. They offer a nationwide legal service which helps consumers find the best representation for their legal needs. You can learn more about Attorney One at our website http://www.attorneyone.com. You can also find us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/AttorneyOne. Checkout earlier news from us at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/10/prweb10059629.htm.