Bel Marra Health Supports a Recent Harvard Health Study that has Linked Two Slices of Bacon Per Day to an Increased Risk of Death

Share Article

Bel Marra Health, well known for offering high-quality, specially formulated vitamins and nutritional supplements, supports a recent Harvard Health study that has linked two slices of bacon per day to an increased risk of death.

Bel Marra Health supports a recent Harvard Health study that has linked two slices of bacon per day to an increased risk of death.

Bel Marra Health supports a recent Harvard Health study that has linked two slices of bacon per day to an increased risk of death.

It is no secret that we all have to be careful about sodium and fat intake, but uncured meat is an option and we all have the ability to control portion. Most food experts don’t tell people to eliminate bacon from their diet, just modify intake with bacon.

Past News Releases

RSS

Bel Marra Health, well known for offering high-quality, specially formulated vitamins and nutritional supplements, supports a recent Harvard Health study that has linked two slices of bacon per day to an increased risk of death.

A recent Harvard study has linked 2 slices of bacon daily to a 20 per cent increased risk of death. The study looked at all red meats and observed the health of over 37 thousand men for a 22 year period and over 83 thousand women for a 28 year period. They documented health problems including cardiovascular issues and cancer. Family history and other disease risk factors were taken into consideration when compiling the data. The authors of this study say other research projects have shown that red meat, and in particular processed meat, is associated with chronic disease due to ingredients like sodium, saturated fat and nitrates.

Spokesperson for Bel Marra Health Dr. Victor Marchione says, “There is research that suggests nitrates, which are used to give bacon its bright red color and to prevent bacterial growth in the meat, can damage your blood vessels. This can lead to hardening of the arteries and of course heart disease. Some nutritional scientists say that you would have to be a huge consumer of processed meat in order to be affected by the nitrates.”

Pork, contains, B6, B12, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, and is high in protein. Food scientists say the key is to find low fat or lean cuts. The other good health tip is not to overcook your bacon or any other processed meat. Pork contains something called haem iron and when you blacken the meat, studies show the charred iron can turn into a carcinogen. Carcinogens are linked to cancer. One of the biggest stories to hit newsstands about bacon this past year was that it could increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. Swedish researchers announced in January that eating 2 slices of bacon or one sausage every day could potentially increase your risk of pancreatic cancer by 19 per cent. Again, St. George Hospital staff are shouting “everything in moderation”.

CEO of Bel Marra Health Jim Chiang says, “It is no secret that we all have to be careful about sodium and fat intake, but uncured meat is an option and we all have the ability to control portion. Most food experts don’t tell people to eliminate bacon from their diet, just modify intake when bacon seems to be in every item on the menu.”

(SOURCE: “Harvard Gazette” School of Public Health study links regular consumption to higher mortality, Oct 30, 2012)

Bel Marra Health is the maker of “Liver Rescue” a high-quality nutritional supplement designed for liver health in formulations designed to address this specific health concern. All ingredients are backed with scientific evidence. Every product is tested for safety, quality, and purity at every stage of the manufacturing process. Furthermore, Bel Marra Health products are produced only in Health Canada approved facilities, going that extra mile to ensure our health conscious customers are getting top quality products. For more information on Bel Marra Health visit http://www.belmarrahealth.com or call 1-866-531-0466.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Bel Marra Health, Inc.
Visit website