Raleigh Criminal Lawyer Damon Chetson to Host Seminar for Recent Law School Grads

Raleigh criminal lawyer Damon Chetson announced today plans to host a free informational seminar for recent law grads in North Carolina who are considering hanging out a shingle or starting a solo or small firm practice.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friend
Raleigh Criminal Lawyer Damon Chetson

Raleigh Criminal Lawyer Damon Chetson

Many recent grads don't have the first clue of how to launch a practice, They can get themselves into real trouble if they don't do it in a careful and thoughtful way.

Raleigh, NC (PRWEB) October 02, 2012

With law schools graduating more than 45,000 law students each year for approximately 25,000 new legal jobs, recently licensed attorneys are experience the worst legal job market in decades.

Law School Transparency, a website that tracks employment statistics at ABA accredited law schools, reports that roughly a third of recent University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill law grads are not employed in full time, long term positions.

These law students and recent grads are being saddled with an average educational debt approaching $100,000. Because the debt is not dischargeable in bankruptcy, most law students are facing years of paying high interest debt back on salaries that don't begin to approach the figures they believed they would earn when the enrolled in law school.

"Law schools are disgorging thousands of law students each year who are ill prepared to face the bleak employment conditions," said Raleigh criminal lawyer Damon Chetson. "Each month I'm approached by a half dozen or more recent graduates who are desperate to find good paying legal work."

Given the lack of preparation of many recent graduates, Mr. Chetson said he is planning on hosting a free seminar in the Raleigh area that will focus providing law students with the practical skills they need to hang out a shingle or work in a small firm or solo practice.

The seminar will address such topics as legal marketing, running an efficient and cost-effective practice, leveraging technology, finding mentors, and complying with various ethical and legal requirements.

"Many recent grads don't have the first clue of how to launch a practice," said Mr. Chetson, who was profiled in 2011 by MSNBC for starting a successful solo practice. "They can get themselves into real trouble if they don't do it in a careful and thoughtful manner."

Mr. Chetson, who is a Raleigh DWI lawyer said that the seminar will be free, will focus on skill building and information sharing, and is open to recent and future graduates who are considering or thinking about starting a small firm practice in North Carolina.

"We plan to have practitioners available who can speak about various different practice areas, about technological issues, compliance issues, and marketing issues," he said. The program will not include Continuing Legal Education credit.

Interested participants can participate in a survey at http://www.chetson.com/lawsurvey to provide input on the content of the seminar that is now in the planning stages.


Contact