Mastermind Groups Launch Writers to New Levels of Professional Success

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The Self Publishing Podcast encourages writers to follow their mastermind group.

Self Publishing Podcast

We once got an email from a writer who listened to our shows for eight hours every night while he stocked shelves at his job. We were his mastermind group, and the idea of that was incredibly flattering.

Writers are known for working alone, but amazing things can happen for those who come together in idea-sharing mastermind groups. So say Sean Platt, David Wright, and Johnny B. Truant, who collectively announced two official book deals and a novel that was written and published in only 29 days on episode 24 of their popular Self Publishing Podcast.

After a year spent producing over 30 titles distinct published works as dedicated self-published writers, Platt and Wright announced that they’ve been signed to produce two serial projects directly with Amazon.com’s publishing arm in the coming months: a “Hunger Games meets The Walking Dead meets 1984” zombie series called Z2134 and a young adult series to be called Monstrous. Truant announced publication of his book Fat Vampire, the idea for which was conceived just 29 days earlier.

“I never would have been able to produce something that fast and that good if I wasn’t constantly discussing writing and publishing with Sean and Dave – and, to be honest, trying in some way to keep up with them,” said Truant of his participation in the Self Publishing Podcast.

Wright and Platt agree that the way the podcast forces them to hone and refine their ideas has been extremely beneficial to their careers as a whole. Each week, the three writers meet for an hour to discuss the craft of writing, the business of publishing, and how to get the most out of both, and all three say they’re better writers and publishers for it.

“Our podcast is like a mastermind group that our subscribers get to listen in on,” said Wright.

Writers don’t need a podcast to form a mastermind group, though. Any group of like-minded writers can get together regularly to discuss their projects and what they’re doing to promote and sell their work – and should, says Platt.

“Teaching forces you to clarify your ideas,” said Platt. “Even if you’re just ‘teaching’ what you do to other writers in someone’s living room, and even if those other writers don’t care about your projects per se, simply talking about your projects benefits you because it hones your thoughts about them. We certainly get ideas from one another on the podcast all the time, but most of the value comes from the way it forces us to explain ourselves as professional writers who take what we’re doing seriously.”

Truant added that if writers can’t find other writers with whom to form a mastermind group, they could find like-minded creatives online, via blogs or social media.

“Or, we on the Self Publishing Podcast can be your mastermind group,” said Truant, noting that simple exposure to “talk about writing” will put a writer in the mindset of taking his or her craft seriously, even if it’s a one-sided exchange. “We once got an email from a writer who listened to our shows for eight hours every night while he stocked shelves at his job. We were his mastermind group, and the idea of that was incredibly flattering.”

Subscribe to the Self Publishing Podcast today and join your own mastermind group.

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Sean Platt
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