Revolution Bike Finance Implores Motorcycle Riders: “Don’t Be a Statistic”

Australian bike loan firm provides stern reminder of road safety rules, and reiterates the importance of safe riding for motorcyclists.

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Revolution Bike Finance

When we say, ‘don’t be a statistic,’ we mean it. A lot of us here ride, and we see motorcycle riders as kindred spirits. As far as we’re concerned, if one person sustains a serious injury on a bike, it’s one too many.

Australia (PRWEB) October 11, 2012

In a recent blog post, Australian motorcycle finance firm Revolution Bike Finance reminded their customers of the urgent need for safety when riding motorcycles. The post quoted statistics from the Australian government and rules and regulations from Western Australia’s publication called “Drive Safe,” which is a summary of the rules of the road for Australian motor vehicles.

The last large study was done from 1998 to 2009. In that period of time, 14% of all vehicular fatalities or serious injuries in Western Australia were to motorcycle riders. In 2007, the numbers were so bad for two-wheeled vehicles that motorcyclists were mathematically demonstrated to be 29.9% more likely to sustain serious injury or death than someone in a car, truck, or van.

Alcohol was cited as a factor in 7% of serious injuries, and speeding was blamed for 18%. Age didn’t seem to make a big difference, as 74% of those seriously injured or killed on a motorcycle were 25 years of age or older, which approximates the amount of drivers on the road of their respective demographics.

The post then reiterated basic driving safety and explained why it is so important for motorcycle riders to follow rules. Among the reasons are that a motorcycle doesn’t provide nearly as much protection as a standard motor vehicle does in impacts, with other vehicles or with stationary objects.

The post recommended that motorcycle drivers stay vigilant on the road, that it is important to follow the speed limit, and to be extremely careful not to follow too closely. It also recommended that motorcyclists remember to use turn signals at all times, because other drivers are less likely to notice them turning than they are larger vehicles, and don’t always see them as well.

The post also reiterated that it is extremely unsafe for a motorcycle rider to ride while drunk, citing the loss of reflexes and coordination, combined with impaired judgment. The post also reminded riders of a few other basic rules of the road that keep drivers and motorcycle riders safe.

Chris Sims, co-owner of Revolution Bike Finance, is serious when it comes to safety: “We get to know our customers, and we want to see them safe and sound. Because motorcycles are so open and so small, and only have two wheels, bringing balance into play, motorcycle riders have to be more careful than car and truck drivers if they want to be safe on the road.”

Sims continued, “There are a lot of bad statistics out there, but that doesn’t mean that every motorcycle has to fall on the bad end of those stats. Simply put, motorcycle riders have to be more careful than drivers of larger vehicles. It’s really a matter of habit. Those in the habit of riding safely will continue to ride safe, and will probably go their entire lives without an incident or a serious injury. That being said, failing to practice safety on the road is not an option.”

Sims concluded, “When we say, ‘don’t be a statistic,’ we mean it. A lot of us here ride, and we see motorcycle riders as kindred spirits. As far as we’re concerned, if one person sustains a serious injury on a bike, it’s one too many.”

Revolution Bike Finance is revolutionising the motorcycle loan industry by providing the utmost in customer service, and fast and affordable bike loans. They specialise in finance solutions and loans for used bikes, dirt bikes, scooters, motocross or ATVs.

For more information, visit their website: http://www.revolutionbikefinance.com.au/ or call them at 1300 882 851.


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