Hagley Lecture Shows Unique History of the Pennsylvania Railroad

Share Article

Hagley Museum and Library welcomes Dr. Albert Churella, Southern Polytechnic State University, on November 15, to speak about the Pennsylvania Railroad. His lecture, "The Unique Railroad of the World: Why the Pennsylvania Railroad was Different from all of the Others,” will begin at 7 p.m. in the Soda House auditorium. The lecture will mark publication of Dr. Churella’s book, The Pennsylvania Railroad, Volume 1: Building an Empire, 1846-1917. The lecture is free. Please use Hagley’s Buck Road entrance. Reservations are requested, 302-658-2400.

The Pennsylvania Railroad, Volume 1: Building an Empire, 1846-1917 by Dr. Albert Churella

Albert Churella’s book is based on exhaustive research at Hagley and other libraries. It is certain to become the authoritative history of the Pennsylvania Railroad.

Hagley Museum and Library welcomes Dr. Albert Churella, Southern Polytechnic State University, on November 15, to speak about the Pennsylvania Railroad. His lecture, "The Unique Railroad of the World: Why the Pennsylvania Railroad was Different from all of the Others,” will begin at 7 p.m. in the Soda House auditorium. The lecture will mark publication of Dr. Churella’s book, The Pennsylvania Railroad, Volume 1: Building an Empire, 1846-1917. The lecture is free. Please use Hagley’s Buck Road entrance. Reservations are requested, 302-658-2400.

    “Albert Churella’s book is based on exhaustive research at Hagley and other libraries,” says Dr. Roger Horowitz, associate director at the Hagley’s Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society, “It is certain to become the authoritative history of the Pennsylvania Railroad.”

    The Pennsylvania Railroad, Volume 1: Building an Empire, 1846-1917 will be part of a multi-volume account from the University of Pennsylvania Press. The book opens with the development of the Main Line of Public Works in the 1820s that foreshadowed the establishment of the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1846. Churella then charts the railroad’s growth over the next fifty years through the Civil War, industrial expansion, and labor unrest, as well as competition with rival railroads and disputes with such figures as Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller. The volume closes at the threshold of American involvement in World War I. Copies will be available for purchase at the lecture.

    Dr. Albert J. Churella is associate professor in the Social and International Studies Department at Southern Polytechnic State University in Marietta, Georgia. His first book, From Steam to Diesel: Managerial Customs and Organizational Capabilities in the Twentieth-Century American Locomotive Industry (1998) was a finalist for the George W. Hilton award in railway history. Churella is completing the first of a two-volume history of the Pennsylvania Railroad, with extensive treatment of the business, technological, labor, public policy, ethnic, and gender issues related to that company. He has also published numerous other articles and book reviews, and has presented papers at conferences in the United States and Europe.

About the Library

Hagley Library is the nation’s leading business history library, archives, and research center. Current holdings comprise 37,000 linear feet in the Manuscripts and Archives Department, 290,000 printed volumes in the Imprints Department, 2 million visual items in the Pictorial Department, and more than 300,000 digital images and pages in the Digital Archives Department. Hagley’s Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society organizes conferences, research seminars, and a public lecture series; it also operates a research grants-in-aid program.

Hagley Museum and Library

    Hagley Museum and Library collects, preserves, and interprets the unfolding history of American enterprise. For more information, call (302) 658-2400 weekdays or visit http://www.hagley.org.

CONTACT: Meg Marcozzi, Marketing Manager
             (302) 658-2400, ext. 238    mmarcozzi(at)hagley(dot)org

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Meg Marcozzi
Visit website