Is Big Brother Helping? New Jersey Attorneys Console & Hollawell Respond to Conflicting Reports about Red-Light Camera Programs

Currently, 25 municipalities in New Jersey are participating in red-light camera programs designed to detect drivers who make illegal turns or run red lights. The programs have been highly lucrative for local governments since their implementation. But with crash rates far from consistent across all programs in the state, New Jersey car accident attorney Richard P. Console Jr. questions their true effectiveness.

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Cameras at intersections don’t prevent accidents. Drivers choosing to obey traffic laws are what actually stop crashes from happening.

Marlton, New Jersey (PRWEB) November 09, 2012

Conflicting reports from New Jersey authorities and American Traffic Solutions show accident rates down at some intersections equipped with red-light cameras, and sharply up at others in the state, according to NJ.com.* Currently, 25 municipalities in New Jersey are participating in red-light camera programs designed to detect drivers who make illegal turns or run red lights. The programs have been highly lucrative for local governments since their implementation. In Lawrence Township, for example, the red-light camera program brought in $422,414.12 in revenue during November 18, 2011 through August 31, 2012, according to the Lawrenceville Patch.** With crash rates far from consistent across all programs in the state, New Jersey car accident attorney Richard P. Console Jr. questions their true effectiveness.

“Cameras at intersections don’t prevent accidents,” said Console. “Drivers choosing to obey traffic laws are what actually stop crashes from happening. These devices may provide the incentive drivers need to adjust their habits, but that doesn’t diminish the responsibility of all motorists to pay attention to light cycles. If a driver tries to speed through a yellow light, and it turns red while they’re in the intersection, they’re probably going to get a citation. They might also get into a serious accident.”

Accident rates at 13 intersections with red-light cameras in 13 different cities in New Jersey have fallen by 64 percent since local governments implemented the programs, according to NJ.com.* Violations at the intersection of U.S. 1 and East Milton Avenue in Rahway in Union County fell by 33 percent. By contrast, collision rates at the intersection of Route 1 and Franklin Corner Road in Lawrence Township have doubled since the municipality installed red-light cameras there, states NJ.com.* Officials point to an increase in rear-end accidents, which may be indicative of drivers abruptly stopping to avoid traveling through yellow lights, as the reason for the increase. Console, whose firm of Union County car accident attorneys has been in existence since 1994, sees a disconnect in the data.

“Human error causes the majority of accidents in New Jersey, in the United States really,” said Console. “When a motorist injures someone in a crash, the driver can’t say they were in a hurry and get out of their responsibility. Taking the appropriate amount of time to stop for traffic lights and respect other drivers sharing the road stops accidents and saves lives.”

The fine for running a red light in New Jersey is $55, but with added fees and special state assessments, the total citation rises to $140 per violation. The base fine also doubles in ‘N.J. safe corridors’ and construction zones.

Richard P. Console Jr. is the managing partner of Console & Hollawell P.C., a personal injury law firm serving accident victims, including those injured at intersections by drivers running red lights, in New Jersey. The firm’s attorneys have earned recognition from their peers and the legal community as a whole with awards and membership in important publications and organizations, including SJ Magazine and The Top 100 Trial Lawyers.

** http://lawrenceville.patch.com/articles/accidents-increase-at-red-light-camera-intersection