Why do Government Initiatives Fail? Cartoon Points its Finger at Poor Consulting

Focus on canned approaches, cheaper resources, and generating paper over action all contribute to failures in improving government.

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Outcomes based on poor consulting.

The spectrum runs from the well-intentioned to unfortunately those that view government acquisition as a kind of ATM for which they only need to find the correct proposal response PIN to extract the dollars.

Reston, VA (PRWEB) November 15, 2012

northRamp, a public sector-focused consultancy, released this week its first in a series of web videos highlighting the obstacles many government organizations encounter when trying to use consultants. The video focuses primarily on the challenges government customers face when relying upon consulting firms that use less experienced resources armed with canned approaches. Also highlighted is the traditional focus of consultants and contractors on designing solutions that may be difficult or impossible to actually implement.

Regarding the video, Patrick Chapman, one of northRamp’s Managing Directors, commented, “We wanted to start pulling back the covers on the flawed approaches used by some of the biggest firms in this space. The reality is there are a lot of good firms out there but there are also simply too many low or no value companies hiding behind window dressing. The spectrum runs from the well-intentioned to unfortunately those that view government acquisition as a kind of ATM for which they only need to find the correct proposal response PIN to extract the dollars.”

Other examples of poor consulting alluded to by the video include the bait and switch of promised experts versus the delivery of junior resources as well as the typical end-product of consulting: more paper reports. “We barely scratched the surface,” Chapman added. “We could have made it two hours and focused only on firms that try to make consulting a commodity in order to drive their own margins."

The video, created using sped up white board drawing, attempts to differentiate between firms with real experience who emphasize piloting approaches versus those that push methodologies aimed only at continuous assessment and analysis. “What we hope people take away from this is that we’ve got to do more as an industry and as stakeholders in making government better, and northRamp is committed to working with firms and agencies who share a passion for driving value and enhancing mission performance.”

The video is available at: http://www.northramp.com/video.