Ocean & Coastal Transportation in the US Industry Market Research Report from IBISWorld has Been Updated

An overall decline in demand for freight transportation caused nearly all operators to struggle during the recession. However, the overall economic revival will pave the way for industry growth, as demand for waterborne freight shipping, cruise travel and higher fuel prices stimulate revenue. Despite these positive factors, external competition will prove to be an imminent threat. For these reasons, industry research firm IBISWorld has updated a report on the Ocean & Coastal Transportation industry in its growing industry report collection.

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Demand for waterborne freight shipping will revive, spurring industry growth

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) November 02, 2012

In the five years to 2012, revenue for the Ocean and Coastal Transportation industry is expected to decline at an annualized rate of 2.2% to $28.3 billion. According to IBISWorld analyst Lauren Setar, “The global shipping market struggled during the recession as consumers began to spend less, reducing the trade of goods around the world.” Cruise companies also felt the economic pinch, and many were forced to reduce prices to maintain capacity. Furthermore, fluctuations in the price of fuel have led firms to pass fuel surcharges onto clients, thereby contributing to revenue volatility. In 2009, falling fuel prices (leading to falling fuel surcharges) and declining demand contributed to a 17.0% reduction in revenue. However, the return to economic growth has caused demand to gain momentum. IBISWorld estimates industry revenue will increase 1.4% in 2012.

While part of the industry is protected by legislation that prevents the participation of foreign operators, an overall decline in demand for freight transportation caused nearly all operators to struggle during the recession. “Flat or declining cargo volumes have paired awkwardly with the expanding fleets of many carriers, creating price competition of higher-than-normal intensity,” says Setar. Such difficulties hit the bottom line across the industry, with many companies experiencing losses in 2009. Poor operating conditions have forced some players out of the industry altogether. In the five years to 2012, IBISWorld estimates the number of firms operating in this industry has declined an average of 1.8% annually to 813. In 2012, profit margins are expected to improve as demand rises once again.

The Ocean and Coastal Transportation industry has a moderate level of concentration, with the four largest players estimated to account for about half of industry revenue in 2012. By contrast, the 2002 US Census reported that the industry's four largest firms had just above one-third of industry revenue, showing that concentration has increased moderately in the years since. As firms have grabbed more market share, some players have been forced out of the industry or acquired by other competitors. This has caused a period of consolidation in the five years to 2012, when the number of industry enterprises has declined an average of 1.8% annually. About 46.2% of firms in this industry employ fewer than five people and 59.5% employ fewer than ten workers. The average number of employees per establishment has trended upwards over the past five years. This is due to an increasing number of workers at the industry's largest firms. These companies have increased their market dominance in the past five years, and their growth in employee numbers has matched this. Over the next five years, IBISWorld projects that industry market share will continue consolidating.

In the five years to 2017, waterborne freight shipping in the United States will pick up as the cogs in the broader economy start turning again. During that time, IBISWorld forecasts that industry revenue will continue its steady growth as the world economy slowly emerges from recession. Revenue growth will also be spurred on by rising demand for cruise vacations and increasing trade volume.

For more information, visit IBISWorld’s Ocean & Coastal Transportation in the US industry report page.

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IBISWorld industry Report Key Topics

This industry provides deep-sea, coastal, Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway water transportation. The deep-sea shipping activity includes US flagged vessels and non-US flagged vessels. Marine transportation establishments using the facilities of the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority Commission are considered to use the Great Lakes water transportation system. This industry also includes deep-sea passenger transportation such as cruise ships.
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Globalization & Trade
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About IBISWorld Inc.
Recognized as the nation’s most trusted independent source of industry and market research, IBISWorld offers a comprehensive database of unique information and analysis on every US industry. With an extensive online portfolio, valued for its depth and scope, the company equips clients with the insight necessary to make better business decisions. Headquartered in Los Angeles, IBISWorld serves a range of business, professional service and government organizations through more than 10 locations worldwide. For more information, visit http://www.ibisworld.com or call 1-800-330-3772.


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