Direct Travel Insurance Releases A Guide On How Much To Tip On Holiday

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Handing a taxi driver, waiter or hotel porter far too big a tip is easily done and a painful mistake to make on holiday. Tipping far too little, on the other hand, can be awkward and embarrassing. Both can be avoided with this guide from the travel insurance experts at Direct Travel.

Handing a taxi driver, waiter or hotel porter far too big a tip is easily done and a painful mistake to make on holiday. Tipping far too little, on the other hand, can be awkward and embarrassing. Both can be avoided with this guide from the travel insurance experts at Direct Travel.

Forewarned is forearmed, say the holiday insurance specialists, and it is worth doing a bit of research.

Being familiar with local bank notes and learning a few basics in the local language can prevent holidaymakers getting flustered at the moment it comes to pay, reducing the chance of tipping mistakes.

Working out the exchange rate in advance and keeping it clearly in mind can avoid the sinking realisation that the waiter is beaming because he has just been handed a £20 tip for a £50 dinner, or the taxi driver has just pocketed a £10 tip for that ten-minute ride, not £1.

An excellent way to save before setting off is to buy high-quality, low-cost single trip travel insurance*, an annual travel insurance policy or ski insurance that provides great cover at a great price.

An important point about tipping is that local practice may be very different to the UK, and varies widely between countries. For example, in Japan it is considered rude to offer any tip at all while in France tipping is optional and 5% is generally thought to be about right.

At the other extreme, one of the highest levels of tipping is in Orlando, Florida, where 20% is the norm. That's an extra £20 on a £100 family meal, so something that might need to be built into holiday budgeting.

Here are some more examples:

  •     In Egypt and Spain the going rate is from 5% to 10%
  •     10% is expected in restaurants in Dubrovnik, Croatia.
  •     A 10% tip in Germany rewards good service and there is no need to tip if things weren't up to scratch.
  •     A 15% tip is usual in Canada.
  •     In Brazil a service charge of 10% is included in the bill.

As for tipping taxi drivers, rounding up the fare is widely accepted around the world.

*Such as provided by Direct Travel Insurance to cover personal belongings, medical emergencies and delays or cancellation.

Notes for Editors

Established in late 1992 and trading since 1993, Direct Travel Insurance specialises in travel insurance for individual travellers, couples and families up to the age of 75. Direct Travel Insurance offers a range of cover options and added benefits including cover for over 100 sports and activities enabling customers to tailor their policies for single trip, annual multi trip, backpacking and winter sports.

All travel insurance policies are underwritten by Chartis Europe Limited. Direct Travel Insurance is a trading name of UNAT Direct Insurance Management Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority (FSA Number 312350). Chartis Europe Limited is also authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority (FSA Number 202628).

This information can be checked by visiting the FSA website.

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Vincenzo Zuccarello
Chartis Direct
0800 980 4313
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