Citizens Launch Campaign in Effort to Fight FDA’s Plan to Seize Constitutional Rights

The Project for Natural Health Choices Inc. is launching a campaign to protect citizen's constitutional right to natural health supplements, targeting the FDA's revised "New Dietary Ingredient" (NDI) regulations.

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Washington D.C. (PRWEB) November 07, 2012

The Project for Natural Health Choices Inc., a natural health company, is launching a campaign targeting the FDA’s revised draft guidance of the “New Dietary Ingredient (NDI) notification protocols”. The Project for Natural Health Choices Inc. wants to rally against the proposed FDA’s regulations that they believe will strip people of their constitutional rights to natural health products.

The proposed FDA regulations may become a problem for natural supplement consumers and industry alike. Basic vitamins like Vitamin A, B complex, C, and D, as well as CoQ 10 may be outlawed and nutritional supplements could be subject to outrageous testing requirements such as undergoing studies that mandate giving subjects doses multiplied by a “safety factor” of as high as 2,000 times the recommended dose, resulting in virtually every one of them being banned.

Animal activists may potentially get involved if costly animal testing became mandated, inflating the cost of basic natural dietary supplements. The only companies that would remain viable will be pharmaceutical giants that are only willing to provide the public with expensive brand drugs that they own monopolies on.

These proposed regulations are the FDA’s belated attempt at compliance with The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA), which had been originally formulated to help Americans achieve good health and greater well being by making supplements abundant and affordable. During the comment period following the release of the draft guidance that ended in December 2011, industry trade associations and natural health rights groups unanimously had called for the guidance to be withdrawn.

Senators Hatch and Harkin, the original authors of Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA), and a number of other members of Congress sent letters to FDA expressing similar views. The stubborn FDA still didn’t budge even as Harkin and Hatch reprimanded the draft guidance, saying that it went beyond the scope of the law. They felt that it by transformed a simple notification system into an approval system, where the FDA will have the power to approve or deny any supplement created in the past seventeen years and that this would result in making the FDA the definitive authority of which natural supplements will and will not be available.

In June 2012, during a second high level meeting with Hatch and Harkin, and almost after a year of industry and citizen’s group outcry, the FDA finally agreed to revise the new dietary ingredient (NDI) draft guidance. However, the degree to which the FDA will actually change the original proposal is a somewhat of a mystery.

The Natural Health Choices Project, Inc. has drafted “The American Bill of Health Rights”, a petition that offers citizens an opportunity to make their voices heard and protect their constitutional rights. Larry Berman, president of the company, has a goal in mind. “We want to inform people about how the passing of these regulations would fundamentally change the natural supplement industry as we know it. I’m glad the FDA finally decided to revise, but that doesn’t mean we’ve won the battle. Major revisions are needed and it’s important we participate because our constitutional right to natural health supplements is at stake.”

Berman, a veteran and natural health enthusiast believes that the difference this campaign will have will depend on “each and every signature, especially when we don’t have the money to influence regulations like the pharmaceutical companies dish out”.

To sign the petition, go to http://www.naturalhealthchoicesproject.com/petition/


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