Expert's Advice to Presidents (And The Public): Get More Sleep

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One of the world's top sleep experts, Dr. Meir Kryger of the Yale University School of Medicine and author of the new book, The iGuide to Sleep, has advice for the current and future Presidents, presidential candidates and the public: get more sleep.

One of the world's top sleep experts has advice for the current and future Presidents, presidential candidates and the public: get more sleep.

Sleep deprivation takes its toll in what is "perhaps the most grueling job in the world. No days off. Stress. Travel. Always on-call. This is a recipe for sleep deprivation," says Dr. Meir Kryger of the Yale University School of Medicine and author of The iGuide to Sleep.

"There is widespread speculation that Barack Obama was very sleep deprived and was falling asleep during his first debate with Mitt Romney. Ronald Reagan fell asleep during an audience with the Pope. Bill Clinton famously had meetings that went through much of the night. William Taft, who weighed as much as 350 pounds, had sleep apnea and was sleepy while in office. The most powerful people in the world are sometimes almost incapacitated by their sleep problems," Dr. Kryger stated in his new book.

The iGuide to Sleep explains how people can recognize sleep problems and how to seek solutions. It is available in Ipad, Nook and Kindle versions.

Dr. Kryger says there are several possible explanations for President Obama's apparent sleep problem during the first debate.

"First is that debate preparation resulted in sleepless nights. Second, the debate took place in Denver, the mile high city. Some people at this altitude develop an abnormal sleep breathing pattern, a variant of sleep apnea, which causes them to have short awakenings during the night resulting in restless or non-refreshing sleep," he explained.

"Reports suggest that Mr. Obama is a night owl who goes to bed late and gets up early. He apparently only gets 4-5 hours sleep, sometimes not even that. Rarely more than that. During the final stages of the 2012 campaign he seemed to be up for 30 to 40 hours at the time with only short stretches of sleep. Mitt Romney also had a grueling schedule and there are photos of him looking sleepy during campaign stops."

Dr. Kryger is a former President of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, the Canadian Sleep Society and a former Chairman and current Board Member of the National Sleep Foundation in Washington, DC.

Information about The iGuide to Sleep is available online at http://sleep.sharepoint.com/Pages/TheiGuidetoSleep.aspx.

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