Fifty Per Cent of Australians Want Aged Care Services to Improve

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New data from The 2012 Menzies-Nous Australian Health Survey shows that 50% of Australians surveyed wanted improved aged care services so the elderly can live at home longer. Wellness & Lifestyles Australia, a mobile allied health services provider, weighs in on the implications of the recently released data.

A lot of the low satisfaction rate can stem from the daily stresses of aged care workers causing them to perform poorly on the job. This is why it’s important for aged care workers to be a good fit for their roles.

Recently released data from The 2012 Menzies-Nous Australian Health Survey showed that half of all Australians surveyed desired better aged care services to allow the elderly to live at home longer.

The survey focused on affordability, accessibility, and confidence in the health care systems. It showed the perceptions and attitudes among Australians regarding their health and aged care systems.

When asked about the aged care system, the majority of Australians surveyed would pay more taxes to improve aged care services so that older people can stay at home longer.

Nick Heywood-Smith, CEO of allied health services provider Wellness & Lifestyles Australia, comments on the data results.

“When people are at their own homes, it’s easier for them to stay in touch with their families. When they are in a facility, there is a barrier to closeness because family members must drive to visit them. So from that perspective, I can see why people prefer to have the elderly stay at home longer,” said Mr. Heywood-Smith.

“What the survey didn’t mention is how much more taxes people are willing to pay to have older people stay at home longer. The gap between how much is needed and how much the people are willing to pay is key here,” he continued.        

Despite being among the least used services, residential aged care facilities received the lowest satisfaction rate among those surveyed. Only 54 per cent were satisfied with their most recent experience of an aged care facility.

“A lot of the low satisfaction rate can stem from the daily stresses of aged care workers causing them to perform poorly on the job. This is why it’s important for aged care workers to be a good fit for their roles. The job is not glamorous, but they do get to make a huge difference in the lives of the people they serve. And it’s important for those going into the career to be aware of how service-oriented they are,” said Mr. Heywood-Smith.

Aged care workers who want to work a flexible schedule can enquire about careers at Wellness & Lifestyles Australia.

About Wellness & Lifestyles

Wellness & Lifestyles Australia (W&L) was established by Nick Heywood-Smith in 2003. It is a market leader in the provision of mobile allied health services in Australia. W&Ls core business is aged-care focused allied health services.

W&L has grown from a home office to a company with the full scope of allied health services including physiotherapy, podiatry, speech pathology, occupational therapy, dietetics, exercise physiology, psychology, diabetes educators, massage, natural therapies, educational training and specialist RNs to facilitate ACFI assessments, Australia-wide.

The company services to over 250 facilities and over 15,000 aged care beds. Its current clients consist of aged care facilities, the intellectually and physically disabled, community health services, day therapy centres, home care package providers, public and regional hospitals and private clients in their homes.

Their vision to become the benchmark for aged care allied health care services in Australia, supplying ‘best in class’ services that surpass needs.

W&L provides a ‘one stop shop’ for allied health services for their clients and focus on providing a ‘work-life’ balance for their therapists. This has been the key to their success.

To join the W&L team of allied health professionals, visit http://www.wellnesslifestyles.com.au/careers/.

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