What are the most dangerous pursuits to film? (infographic)

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New survey by Mediaworks on behalf of Jessops shows that it’s those photographing or recording dangerous sports and activities, not those taking part, that are thought to be most at risk by the public

the most dangerous photography jobs on earth jessops

the most dangerous photography jobs on earth jessops

According to Mediaworks Claire Stokoe: “It seems that we are more aware of the mechanism of how still or video images get in the press or on TV than was assumed. We know that those fantastic shots with wildlife charging, natural disasters unfolding or a

Why do otherwise rational human beings seem determined to see just how close to death or injury they can get in the name of fun? Digital agency Mediaworks carried out an online survey using Facebook and Twitter to find out which activity was thought to be most reckless by most people. When compared to what actuaries consider being ‘dangerous avocations’, what is and what isn’t considered foolhardy by the general public reflects some surprisingly informed and nuanced opinions.

Angling in fact kills more people than any other outdoor pursuit due to hapless (and no doubt inebriated) fishermen falling into lakes/streams/ponds and drowning, but it didn’t even figure on the top ten list of hobbies/occupations thought to be potentially lethal. Motor Racing of any type including a car, motorbike, go-cart, dune buggy or powerboat racing came out as number one and that at least chimes with insurance companies’ assessment of risk. B.A.S.E. Jumping (Buildings, Antennas, Spans and Earth) involving leaping from buildings, cliffs or towers wearing a parachute and a wingsuit was also thought one of the most dangerous outdoor pursuits in the world with a very high death rate. It is not insurable.

However, the survey conducted on behalf of Jessops turned up some surprisingly insightful views on risk by those who responded. Although motor racing was considered highly dangerous as a participant or spectator by the majority (62%), a significant number of those surveyed (18%) thought that a cameraman or photographer filming the action for the press or TV was at even greater risk. The reason respondents gave was that the photographer or cameraman would be more focussed on ‘getting the shot’ and pay less attention than a spectator would to a developing dangerous situation.

Fascinated by this unexpected show of media savvy, Mediaworks subsequently asked those who’d highlighted the photographer as being most in peril what photographic assignments they thought would be most risky. The results are compiled in a neat infographic which describes the top five situations where photo journalists would be in jeopardy: motor sport, extremes of weather and natural disasters, war zones, underwater photography and caving.

According to Mediaworks Claire Stokoe: “It seems that we are more aware of the mechanism of how still or video images get in the press or on TV than was assumed. We know that those fantastic shots with wildlife charging, natural disasters unfolding or a frontman facing peril exist only because someone was actually standing there with an eye on a viewfinder, often without concern for their own personal safety”.

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claire stokoe
Mediaworks
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