Television Reporter John Sudworth Develops Sudden Onset Bell’s Palsy

Director of the Facial Paralysis Institute and world-renowned surgeon Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, says that nearly 90% of those afflicted with this type of facial paralysis make a full recovery

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For the few cases of Bell’s palsy that do not go away on their own, there are a variety of treatment options available that can help restore a symmetrical facial appearance and facial movement.

Beverly Hills, CA (PRWEB) November 23, 2012

According to BBC News, television reporter John Sudworth has recently developed a form of facial paralysis known as Bell’s Palsy. This type of disorder often presents itself with no warning signs, with people commonly reporting awaking without being able to move one side of their face. Expert facial paralysis surgeon, Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS in Beverly Hills, says that the condition can be extremely hard to deal with in its initial stages.

Bell’s palsy can be very difficult for people to accept, but it’s important to stay positive and patient throughout the process, as almost all 90% of cases will experience an almost complete recovery,” said Dr. Azizzadeh.

Facial paralysis, a condition affecting nearly 1 out of every 65 people at some point in their lives, is not as uncommon as most think. Though it can develop suddenly and without warning, Bell’s palsy is commonly seen in pregnant women, people with diabetes, and those who have had a previous episode at an earlier time in their life. The cause of Bell’s palsy remains unknown, though most physicians believe it to be a result of a viral infection that brings swelling to the facial nerve.

Sudworth isn’t the first television presence to become afflicted with the disorder, as it has been reported that both Sylvester Stallone and George Clooney had previously suffered from the condition and made a full recovery. It’s common for those experiencing Bell’s palsy to recovery within six months of initial onset, though there are a few cases that may be long-standing.

“For the few cases of Bell’s palsy that do not go away on their own, there are a variety of treatment options available that can help restore a symmetrical facial appearance and facial movement. Patients can undergo treatment for Bell’s palsy, and that is something that I want people to be aware of,” said Dr. Azizzadeh.

Dr. Azizzadeh is the director of the Facial Paralysis Institute and one of the leading figures in the field of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Dr. Azizzadeh has been recognized for his work on several occasions, and has appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Show and countless other media outlets. After completing his prestigious training at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Azizzadeh has gone on to help hundreds of individuals afflicted with varying degrees of facial paralysis and Bell’s Palsy. Specially trained in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery as well as head and neck surgery, Dr. Azizzadeh has distinctive insight into facial aesthetics and facial nerve function.

If you would like to learn more about Bell’s Palsy and the treatments offered for facial paralysis by the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills, please contact Dr. Azizzadeh by calling (310) 657-2203. Additional information is also available by visiting the office online at http://www.facialparalysisinstitute.com.


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