Competition Key To Beating High Energy Bills

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It’s not all doom and gloom this winter as Weekly Independent.com shows new ways to beat the energy price hikes.

Commercial businesses and medium to large organisations will be able to beat the energy price hikes this winter by looking outside of the top 6 UK energy suppliers. That is according to an article which appears at Weekly Independent.com.

“Independent groups outside of the heavy hitters are more likely to provide better deals and a more efficient service simply because they are able to negotiate separately from the major utility companies. This kind of competition encourages all concerned to keep the playing field level.”
http://www.weeklyindependent.com/2012/10/31/why-are-fuel-energy-prices-so-high/

This opinion appears to be reflected already by some of the major independent suppliers in the UK revealing a potential glimpse into the future of the energy industry in the next few years. Many independent suppliers believe that they can’t be expected to maintain a loyal custom base without maintaining a healthy competitive edge.

“If we don’t provide the service our customers have paid for, then they are completely justified in switching suppliers.”
Karolina Wawrowski, http://www.crownoiluk.com/

The article goes on to claim that the power is entirely within the UK public control and that it is only a naïve and uninformed person who believes the energy companies are to be solely held to account. The top 6 energy companies in the UK will only raise prices if they truly believe the average customer will pay for it. Weekly Independent.com goes on to claim that the public should be held to account for the price rises over the suppliers.

With prices rising by up to 10% for gas and electricity in early 2013, encouraging competition is key to getting the best price. Weekly Independent believes that a naïve public shouldn’t complain about any price rises when there are so many different options available. With major independent suppliers on record as saying that control is with the customer, the public will be hard pushed to disagree.

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Edward Bennett

Edward Bennett
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