Bank of America Loan Modification Horror Story Video Series Gains in Popularity on the Banking Bad You Tube Channel

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A new trailer giving a sneak peek into the next installment of the “Bank of America Wants You to Die… Before They Modify” video series has just been released. The series chronicles the true story of a Bank of America customer who was repeatedly asked by the bank to provide a “death certificate” along with conventional financial documents in order to receive a Bank of America home loan modification. The first video in the series was featured on BloombergBusinessweek.

Bank of America wants you to die

Bank of America Loan Modification video

Initially, I thought the bank was making quite a few mistakes with all of their repeated, outrageous requests, but they continued this madness until I started broadcasting their shocking Bank of America loan modification horror story on social media.

When Southern California filmmaker De Veau Dunn went to Bank of America to apply for a refinance on his home loan, he had no idea he would be offered a loan modification that would quickly turn into a fiasco. The details of his situation were ultimately featured in BloombergBusinessweek. Dunn was asked to provide a death certificate multiple times, along with other financial documents, in order to complete the financial transaction with Bank of America.

“Initially, I thought the bank was making quite a few mistakes with all of their repeated, outrageous requests, but they continued this madness until I started broadcasting their shocking Bank of America loan modification horror story on social media,” said Dunn.

The "Bank of America Wants You to Die… Before they Modify” video that Dunn released has received close to 30,000 views on the Banking Bad Youtube Channel. When asked what prompted the making of the video Dunn replied, “Initially I did not want to make a video about this experience, but I felt I needed to produce this project in case there were other people out there that were silently enduring this type of abuse.” It turns out Dunn’s instincts were right, as his first video has received quite a number of emails and remarks on the Banking Bad YouTube channel. Most of the comments and emails Banking Bad has received mentioned the same types of problems with loan modifications that he highlights in his first video.

Dunn says, “Ultimately, I am very happy to be a part of a movement that sheds light on abuses by banking institutions that might have otherwise been swept under the rug or forgotten. It feels good knowing that I am helping other homeowners in the process of modifying their home loans to achieve some degree of economic relief.”

Dunn has also teamed up with homeowners advocate Steve Triebernig, who hosts the Facebook page Keep Bank of America Honest. Steve has been instrumental in helping a number of homeowner’s in dealing with the banks in order to save their homes through his company All Things Real Estate that was nominated for a Better Business Bureau Integrity Award; “All things Real Estate” is located in Minnesota.

Dunn concludes, “So far, the real benefit of all of this has been tapping into a vast social network of consumers that are in some way being adversely affected by the sometimes appalling behavior of big banks. People have been connecting and reaching out to "Banking Bad" on the Banking Bad Twitter feed, Facebook and YouTube channel. Social media has truly changed the speed and volume in which the world can connect and make progress.”

About Banking Bad:
The Banking Bad website and YouTube channel are dedicated to educating and informing the public of strange or immoral activities involving banking institutions. Banking Bad’s social media experience allows users to join the conversation and exchange information about their latest loan modification or banking pitfalls or successes.

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Lili Villia
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