Hidden Hearing Respond to Study which Identifies Gene for Age Related Hearing Loss

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Private hearing healthcare solutions provider, Hidden Hearing, have responded to research that has identified a genetic biomarker for age related hearing loss.

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It is important that anyone who notices any changes in their hearing ability, book a hearing test with a qualified and registered Hearing Aid Dispenser.

A nine year study by researchers at the University of South Florida in the United States has identified a genetic biomarker for presbycusis, a genetic mutation carried by people who ultimately suffer from age related hearing loss and is linked to speech processing abilities in older people.

The research was published in the journal Hearing Research and looked at 687 people who all had a three hour extensive examination of their hearing capabilities including genetic analyses and testing of speech processing.

The researchers discovered a gene that produces key protein in the inner ear (the cochlea) called glutamate receptor metabotropic 7 (GRM7). The protein is involved in converting sound into the code of the nervous system in the cochlea and sending it to the brain to be used for hearing and speech processing.

The research also found that while the genetic mutation had a negative impact for men, women actually had better than average hearing later in life.

A spokesperson for Hidden Hearing said:

“It is important that anyone who notices any changes in their hearing ability, book a hearing test with a qualified and registered Hearing Aid Dispenser”.

With more than 40 years’ experience in treating hearing loss,Hidden Hearing is entrusted with the care of more than 100,000 people each year. The firm has 84 hearing centres across the UK, all catering for a range of needs and budgets. Specialising in hearing tests and hearing aids, the company also offer a variety of hearing aid accessories and in 2005, became the first dedicated hearing retailer to be recognised as an Investor in People.

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Vicky Moore
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