Ash Tree Dieback is currently set to cause devastation to Britain’s woodlands

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It was first noted as entering the UK in February 2012, but since then it has spread and has been found in 115 sites across the country.

Ash Tree Dieback

Ash Tree Dieback infographic

It was first noted as entering the UK in February 2012, but since then it has spread and has been found in 115 sites across the country.

When this disease hit Denmark, it killed off 90% of ash trees in just 7 years and, with ash trees being Britain’s third most abundant species, covering 129,000 hectares of woodland, the impact of this disease could drastically affect the British countryside.

One company is trying to do something about it.

Crowders is a gardening company which has been directly affected by Ash Dieback. The fungus was discovered in a batch of their ash trees during the summer. As a direct result, they were contacted by Plant Health Unit of FERA, who carried out inspections of their nurseries. Following these inspections they were ordered to destroy 50,000 ash trees.

Crowders has complied with all the orders given to them, however, they are now seeking compensation from the Government to cover loss of business, loss of stock, costs of destruction, and damage to reputation by publicly quoting details of this incidence of the disease despite maintaining confidentiality over other outbreaks. In total their loss so far is equal to over £200,000.

In order to raise awareness about this disease Crowders have created an infographic about it. The infographic includes the signs to look for to spot ash dieback, as well as further information on how it spreads and its potential effects.

The hope is that, by providing this information to as wide a number of people as possible, Crowders can raise public awareness about ash dieback. It is hoped that by spreading this infographic, knowledge will be shared and any instances of it can be quickly reported and contained, thus reducing the risk of it causing wide-spread destruction.

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Mike Frecklington
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