Exceptional Minds Vocational School for Youth With Autism Visits 3D Effects Studio Stereo D, Known for its 3D Imagery of Titanic 3D and The Avengers

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Vocational school explores rising need for 3D post-production as possible careers for young adults with autism. Converting live-action or animated films to 3D requires considerable computer skill and hyper-focus on detail, traits that are often attributed to individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Exceptional Minds school and working studio for young adults on the autism spectrum.

Exceptional Minds, vocational school for young adults on the autism spectrum

We were blown away by the genuine interest and especially how much Exceptional Minds students already knew about roto.

Exceptional Minds post-production vocational school for young adults on the autism spectrum added 3D rotoscoping to its lesson plan last week with a field trip to Stereo D, the post-production studio responsible for converting to 3D imagery such films as Titanic in 3D and The Avengers.

“With this field trip to Stereo D, we got a front row seat into all the latest developments in 3D imagery and what is quite possibly an ideal career path for many of our students,” comments Susan Zwerman, visual effects producer and board member for Exceptional Minds, a ground-breaking vocational school that is bridging the gap between high school and the working world for young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by preparing them for careers in animation, post-production and computer graphics.

Students toured the Stereo D facility in Burbank on November 29 and were given hands-on lessons in rotoscoping by rotoscope artists working in the field. Rotoscoping is a visual effects technique used to trace over footage, frame by frame, in order to convert 2D live-action and animated films to 3D. The technique requires considerable computer skill and a hyper-focus on detail, traits that are often attributed to individuals with ASD.    

“We were blown away by the genuine interest and especially how much Exceptional Minds students already knew about roto,” commented Stereo D Executive Vice President and Chief Creative Officer Aaron Parry, who demonstrated for students some of the newer techniques used to convert 2D video to 3D.

The need for 3D live-action and animated movies and other content is expected to increase in demand as newer television sets with 3D capability enter the market, many based on new technology that eliminates the use of 3D viewing glasses.

“Our students were very fortunate to be able to learn from the best,” commented Zwerman.
Exceptional Minds was chartered last year by professionals in the post-production and film industry and started its second year with a waiting list for enrollment into its three-year program, which includes technical training for Adobe certification, job readiness skills and a professional reel/portfolio that graduates can use to seek employment in the fields of animation, computer graphics and visual effects.

The unique vocational school is a nonprofit charity organization that has received support from the Hollywood industry, including Tom Hanks, Ed Asner, Adobe Systems and DreamWorks Animation.

About Exceptional Minds (http://www.exceptionalmindsstudio.org)

Exceptional Minds is a non-profit vocational center and working production studio for young adults on the autism spectrum. Chartered in 2011 to provide the training necessary for visually-gifted individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD0 who may not otherwise be able to make the transition from high school to the working world, Exceptional Minds offers technical proficiency and work readiness skills that prepare students for careers in graphic arts, animation, web design, visual effects and rotoscoping. Located in Sherman Oaks, California, Exceptional Minds is both an instructional learning facility and a working studio with hands-on student involvement in production projects, many for the film industry.

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