Kettlebell Training Expert Lorna Kleidman Comments on an Article about Risks of Ibuprofen Use for Athletes

Following a recent New York Times article which reports that athletes using ibuprofen to preemptively treat muscle soreness can have negative risks, kettlebell training expert Lorna Kleidman offers a response.

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Bohemia, NY (PRWEB) December 10, 2012

On December 10 2012, kettlebell training expert Lorna Kleidman, comments on a new study from Maastricht University in the Netherlands which revealed increased risk in damaging intestines when athletes used ibuprofen daily to preemptively treat their muscle soreness.

According to the news article in the New York Times, Dr. Kim van Wijck, a surgical resident at Orbis Medical Center in the Netherlands led a study that took nine healthy men and examined how daily use of ibuprofen affected their gastrointestinal tracts before and after exercising. The article states that previous studies have shown that strenuous exercise can cause slight intestinal trauma by itself which leads to small amounts of gastrointestinal leakage. Dr. Kim van Wijck reassures that this trauma to the intestines disappears shortly after exercising and converts back to a normal state.

However, the article continues to state that ibuprofen has a common side-effect of gastrointestinal damage as well. Dr. Kim van Wijck’s study put these nine healthy men under controlled situations to determine if ibuprofen increases the damage done to the athletes intestines. The study “found that blood levels of a protein indicating intestinal leakage were, in fact, much higher when the men combined bike riding with ibuprofen than during the other experimental conditions when they rode or took ibuprofen alone.” Although it is not solidly evident how this can affect the athletes’ health, Dr. Kim van Wijck finds the results “worrying” and believes that if ibuprofen were consumed on a long term basis for exercise, “intestinal integrity might be compromised.”

The article concludes to state other studies have also found athletes like ultra marathoners who regularly used ibuprofen before exercising had trace amounts of colonic bacteria in their bloodstream which counteracts the anti-inflammatory benefits of ibuprofen. Thus, the article reports, the athletes using ibuprofen experienced higher levels of inflammation than those athletes who did not take ibuprofen.

Lorna Kleidman, kettlebell training expert, commented, “Even though the findings do not yield clear health implications, the increased damage to athletes’ intestines should not be taken lightly. We only have one body, it’s imperative to have a healthy balance and avoid potentially harmful habits that can have negative effects in the future.”

Lorna Kleidman is a Three-Time World Champion and World Record holder in kettlebell sport and the most decorated kettlebell athlete in the country. She developed the innovated methods used in KettleX as a way to bring the benefits of the bells to everyone in an easy to use, comprehensive and fun format. Lorna has been teaching individuals and group classes for the past six years.


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