Hidden Hearing Respond to New Australian Study of MP3 Related Hearing Loss

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Private hearing healthcare solutions provider, Hidden Hearing, have responded to an Australian study that further highlights the dangers of irresponsible MP3 use.

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Many people are exposing themselves to dangerous levels of noise, without realising the long term affects they could be causing to their hearing.

A recent Australian study has found that 70% of young people have experienced tinnitus, with MP3 players the most damaging of all leisure noise.

The study by Better Hearing Australia found that constant exposure to loud noise was the number one cause of hearing loss, with a quarter of problems caused by listening to MP3 players at excessive and damaging levels.

It is thought that many don’t realise how little noise can cause trauma in the ear and hearing damage, with one in four people expected to experience hearing loss by 2050.

Almost half of those questioned that were aged 18 to 34 went to noisy bars and pubs and listened to music through headphones at least once a week.

A spokesperson from Hidden Hearing said:

“This research shows a worry trend of many young people experiencing tinnitus. People are exposing themselves to dangerous levels of noise, without realising the long term affects they could be causing to their hearing. The World Health Organisation recommends a safe level of 70dB and you should book a hearing test if you think you may be experiencing the symptoms of hearing loss.”

With more than 40 years’ experience in treating hearing loss, Hidden Hearing is entrusted with the care of more than 100,000 people each year. The firm has 84 hearing centres across the UK, all catering for a range of needs and budgets. Specialising in hearing tests and hearing aids, the company also offer a variety of hearing aid accessories and in 2005, became the first dedicated hearing retailer to be recognised as an Investor in People.

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Vicky Moore
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