Painter of President Barack Obama’s Portrait Suffers From Facial Paralysis Condition, Bell’s Palsy

Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, and director of the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills, says that Bell’s palsy can occur without warning and with a very quick onset

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dr babak azizzadeh md
When Bell’s palsy occurs, many patients are completely unaware as to what is happening to their face. It’s very common, as happened with Fiona, that people believe that may be suffering from a stroke because half of their face becomes immobile.

Beverly Hills, CA (PRWEB) December 25, 2012

According to recent reports, artist to President Barack Obama’s self portrait in the Library of Congress, Fiona Hawthorne, has been diagnosed with Bell’s palsy, a form of facial paralysis, which can occur quickly and without warning. Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, and expert facial paralysis surgeon in Beverly Hills explains that the condition can be very difficult to deal with.

Bell’s palsy is a form of facial paralysis that can affect people of all ages and prevents facial movement on one side rather quickly. Its cause cannot be identified one hundred percent, though it is believed to be a re-activation of the herpes virus,” said Dr. Azizzadeh.

Fiona became afflicted with the condition nearly two years ago and initially believed that she may be suffering from a stroke. Prior to developing Bell’s palsy, Fiona underwent eardrum surgery and thought that her symptoms of facial paralysis may have been related. Upon seeking professional help from a medical doctor, Fiona was told that she was suffering from Bell’s palsy.

“When Bell’s palsy occurs, many patients are completely unaware as to what is happening to their face. It’s very common, as happened with Fiona, that people believe that may be suffering from a stroke because half of their face becomes immobile,” said Dr. Azizzadeh

In nearly 90% of cases, Bell’s palsy is not permanent and usually clears up in several months following an initial diagnosis. At the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills, Dr. Azizzadeh provides his patients with several different treatment options that can help alleviate symptoms and improve facial symmetry, including Botox.

“Sufferers of Bell’s palsy often do not want to undergo invasive surgery until it becomes clear whether or not their condition will be permanent. At my practice, I treat a great deal of patients with Botox therapy, which allows the paralyzed muscles to relax and achieves facial balance,” said Dr. Azizzadeh.

Since his extensive and prestigious training at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Azizzadeh has helped hundreds of people with varying degrees of facial paralysis. Dr. Azizzadeh is the director of the Facial Paralysis Institute and one of the leading figures in the field of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Dr. Azizzadeh has been recognized for his work on several occasions, and has appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Show and countless other media outlets.

Dr. Azizzadeh is trained in Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, as well as Head & Neck Surgery, giving him a distinctive insight into facial nerve function and facial aesthetics. For more information regarding Bell’s palsy and other treatable conditions relating to facial paralysis, please contact the Facial Paralysis Institute by calling (310) 657-2203 or by visiting http://www.facialparalysisinstitute.com.


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