As the U.S. Enters its Fifth Year in Recession, Career Coach Hallie Crawford Issues New Job Tips: Careers Are American’s New “Best Assets”

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Despite the drop in the unemployment rate in November to its lowest point since 2007, Certified Career Coach Hallie Crawford announced today that employed people should not assume their positions are safe. With 12 million individuals still seeking work—and the Department of Labor’s household survey indicating there were 122,000 fewer jobs last month—Crawford urges those with jobs to view their career as their most valuable asset and treat it with care and appreciation. However, she says, that doesn’t mean they should live in fear.

“Those who have survived this long may become complacent that their job is secure, when in reality, many industries are still shaving positions,” says Hallie Crawford, certiifed career coach.

Despite the drop in the unemployment rate in November to its lowest point since 2007, Certified Career Coach Hallie Crawford announced today that employed people should not assume their positions are safe. With 12 million individuals still seeking work—and the Department of Labor’s household survey indicating there were 122,000 fewer jobs last month—Crawford urges those with jobs to view their career as their most valuable asset and treat it with care and appreciation. However, she says, that doesn’t mean they should live in fear.

“Those who have survived this long may become complacent that their job is secure, when in reality, many industries are still shaving positions,” says Crawford. “Those who have jobs—especially positions that they really enjoy or that are part of their career path—should do everything they can to improve their employer’s opinion of them, but without giving in to negativity.” Crawford offers the following tips for those with jobs to help achieve this goal:

Tip #1 Be the Best Possible Employee

  •     Nurture your career within your position, perhaps by seeking duties that relate to a position you would like to later hold.
  •     Educate yourself about your job, your employer, your field of work and any position into which you would like to move.
  •     Be dedicated to every task—“go the extra mile” for your employer.
  •     Pitch in to help with unpopular projects.
  •     Be a team player—do more to help others and/or the firm.
  •     Help the firm save money by saving paper, reducing your use of supplies, turning off lights when you are the last one to leave the room, etc.
  •     Be open to new ways of doing things, and master any beneficial technology that’s available but you haven’t learned.

Tip #2: Stay positive

  •     Take time each morning to think about what is going right and what you’re doing well. Make a list and add to it when you get home from work.
  •     Don’t focus on unfounded fears, like whether you might still be laid off or that you’ll lose your 401(k) if the market takes another nose dive. If you feel yourself dwelling on negative ideas, do something (like planning how to further your career!) that takes your attention away from those thoughts.
  •     Avoid the “negative Nellies” in your work and life so you won’t be dragged down with them.

Tip #3: Maintain Work-Life Balance

  •     If you are working smarter, making more effort at work shouldn’t require you to work longer hours. Draw the line between work and home time and stick to it. That includes setting boundaries for how often you check email, use your work phone, etc. at night and on weekends.
  •     Use your free time productively—even if it’s just taking the family to the park for a picnic. Having a rich personal life will make you a better employee at work.

Tip #4: Take Care of Yourself

  •     Regular exercise is vital to your well-being, especially when stress levels are higher. Make it a priority to engage in some kind of aerobic exercise at least three times a week. You have more mental clarity when you do this.
  •     Maintain a healthy diet—you’ll feel better and more alert and focused.
  •     Get enough sleep. While skipping sleep won’t hurt you if it happens occasionally, some studies link brain deterioration and increased mortality rates to lack of sleep. Shoot for a minimum of seven hours a night, on average—eight if you can manage it.

“This recession has been stressful for everyone—including those with jobs,” says Crawford. “In fact, those who ARE working may have shouldered more responsibilities than they can reasonably handle—including volunteering to help others who are less fortunate. Staying in good shape, mentally, physically and professionally is the best way for workers to ensure their employer values their efforts, and to enable them to thrive no matter what 2013 brings.”

About Create Your Career Path
Since 2002 Create Your Career Path and their team of certified career coaches have helped job searchers nationwide identify their ideal career path, navigate their career transition and achieve their career goals. New college grads through mid-career professionals have used our career coaches to find their dream job. Create Your Career Path was founded by certified career coach, speaker and author Hallie Crawford. Crawford has served on the Board of the Georgia Coach Association, and is regularly featured as a career expert on CNN, Fox Business News, the Wall Street Journal, Yahoo HotJobs and Entrepreneur Magazine. She is a regular contributor to Examiner.com.

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Jennifer Koon
Michael Mackenzie Communications
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