Pangea Tutor Launches New Educational Geography Game for Students

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New online educational game provides students a great opportunity for learning about foreign countries in a kid-safe environment.

Kids build their visual vocabulary of foreign countries at Pangea Tutor.

Pangea Tutor gives students an exciting way to learn about real-world geographic locations without the expense of foreign travel.  Pangea Tutor's innovative educational game places the student into various international cities via its curated, kid-safe collection of geographically themed video clips. This captivating game challenges students to match up the right country to the video clip being shown. The website features a simple scoring system that aggregates each day's results and charts their progress as they continue to play in the weeks and months ahead. 

Pangea Tutor helps build a student's international visual vocabulary by showcasing video clips that feature landmarks, foreign language signage, unique characteristics of the people, local architecture, famous travel destinations and much more. So what does a taxi cab look like in London, Hong Kong or Mumbai? Can a student tell if a street sign is written in Italian or French? Pangea Tutor helps develop a student's visual vocabulary, which in many ways is like learning a second language. In an ever-increasing globalized world, a student's ability to master these skills will help them open new doors of opportunity as they start connecting with the outside world.
 
Pangea Tutor offers an affordable educational solution that costs less than $2 dollars a month.  In addition, Pangea Tutor offers everyone a free trial of its educational game that requires no payment or credit card for sign up.  PangeaTutor.com is an exciting new educational tutoring game that teaches student's about foreign countries without the costly expense of international travel.      

PANGEA - The name of a vast ancient continental area or supercontinent comprising all the continental crust of the earth, which is postulated to have existed in late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic times before its breaking up about 200 million years ago. This was an era before the earth had continents or countries, before borders and vast separating oceans, a time when the world was connected as a vast super continent. For the past two hundred million years the Earth's landmasses have been drifting apart - until the Internet pulled them all back together again. Pangea Tutor now strives to help students learn about their newly reconnected world during this modern era of Pangea.

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Craig McCourry
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