Off The Grid News Features Winter Growing Strategies For Optimum Health

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Off The Grid News releases a new article to help people stay healthy by growing their own non-GMO exotic fruits such as coffee, black pepper, and pineapples.

Off The Grid News Article Helps Everyone Figure Out How To Grow Their Own Exotic Foods

Grow Your Own Exotic Foods

For most nutrients, the low deficiency rates, less than 1 to 10 percent, are encouraging, but higher deficiency rates in certain age and race/ethnic groups are a concern and need additional attention.

Independent survival publication Off The Grid News offers practical tips on growing exotic crops during the harsh winter months in a feature that appeared Monday, December 17. The feature focuses on the seasonal trend of keeping tropical plants indoors, where they can yield fruit during months when they would never thrive outside, thus making available vitamins and nutrients to maintain health.

According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, research indicates that there is a clear importance to having a variety of nutrients in your diet when it comes to fighting disease and maintaining health. They encourage that the best way to do this is to get your vitamins and minerals from a variety of foods, which in turn will help reduce the risk of chronic diseases. And while supplementation when adequate nutrients aren’t available is fine, nothing can compete with the safety and effectiveness of adequate nutrition derived from a good diet.

According to Today’s Dietitian Magazine, the most challenging time of the year for people to get the proper nutrition from foods is during the winter months. Off the Grid News’ feature article discusses the benefits of harvesting different types of exotic crops and their seasonal uses during the winter. In addition to citrus and other fruits that grow on trees, indoor winter crops can encompass everything from spices such as vanilla and black pepper to bright coffee beans that can be roasted and stored. The article discusses the winter uses of each plant and also touches upon ways to avoid common problems with winter harvest, including temperature issues, lack of light, and low humidity.

The 2012 Second National Report on Biochemical Indicators of Diet and Nutrition, released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), indicates that while the U.S. population has good levels of some nutrients, there are deficiency rates in others and that Americans do not necessarily consume healthy and balanced diets.

According to a release published by the CDC in April of 2012, “Research shows that good nutrition can help lower people’s risk for many chronic diseases. For most nutrients, the low deficiency rates, less than 1 to 10 percent, are encouraging, but higher deficiency rates in certain age and race/ethnic groups are a concern and need additional attention,” said Christine Pfeiffer, Ph.D., lead researcher in the Division of Laboratory Sciences in CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health.

Off The Grid News provides this timely article to encourage people to take an active role in maintaining adequate nutritional levels during the winter months. This article is available online at http://www.OffTheGridNews.com/2012/12/17/growing-your-own-exotic-crops/.

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Tony Belha
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