2012 London Film Awards Announces Winners

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"Beauty and the Breast" directed by Liliana Komorowska wins the London Film Awards’ top prize, the Gold Lion Award and Grand Jury Prize. “Womble” directed by Robert Pirouet wins the competition’s Special Jury Award.

LFA received submissions representing some of the world’s most talented filmmakers. After careful consideration, we have distilled the very best of this year’s entries.

Jury Prizes and top award-winners of the 2012 London Film Awards were announced December 17th, 2012. The London Film Awards is London’s premiere film awards body which celebrates and awards the work of independent film's best and brightest contemporary filmmakers and screenwriters spanning the globe. The Official Jury selected one exclusive Gold Lion Award Winner for each official competition category, the awards’ highest and most esteemed honors. A full list of the 2012 winners can be found at the competition’s official website, http://www.londonfilmawards.com.

“Our 2012 competition marks an incredible year for the London Film Awards. LFA received submissions representing some of the world’s most talented filmmakers. After careful consideration, we have distilled the very best of this year’s entries,” said Joey Paulos, Executive Director of the London Film Awards. “We are honored to celebrate the talent and commitment of each of these accomplished artists.”

The Grand Jury Prize was presented to Beauty and the Breast directed by Liliana Komorowska (Canada).
Synopsis: A first-time documentary filmmaker offers a compelling insight into the devastating reality of breast cancer, as seen through the eyes of several female patients helping demystify the deadly disease while painting poignant and often humorous intimate.

The Special Jury Prize was presented to Womble directed by Robert Pirouet (United Kingdom).
Synopsis: Years have passed and what's changed? Jim Labey sits waiting in the corridor of his old school waiting for a job interview. The problem? The other side of the desk is Piers Mourant, an old classmate of Jim's...and Pier's remembers everything!

The Best Feature Film was presented to Pechorin directed by Roman Khrushch (Russia).
Synopsis: Based on the Russian classic Mikhail Lermontov novel “The Hero of Our Time”. All events shown as they are reflected in the mind of the dying hero, as a series of irrevocable mistakes and interpreted anew: it is either reconsideration or repentance.

The Best Short Film was presented to Dissarray directed by Chandradeep Das (India).
Synopsis: A day in the life of an obsessed loner whose immaturity and emotional isolation lead to dynamic imbalances in his life, driving him even to a point where he considers killing the girl.

The Best Animated Film was presented to Seasons directed by Haowei Hu (USA).
Synopsis: Seasons, is a surreal motion graphics animation based on the changing seasons. Beginning with spring, the richly hued illustrations in this work come alive as they transform in color and rhythmic tempo to reveal the full seasonal spectrum.

The Best Documentary Short was presented to Ian Wright / Nothing to Something directed by Marcel Beckford (United Kingdom).
Synopsis: This detailed account documents the rise of a young black boy from the harder side of South East London, who rose through all adversity to become the highest scoring player for Arsenal Football Club.

The Best Screenplay was presented to One of These Things is Not Like the Others directed by Adam Wilson (USA).
Synopsis: Josh, a NYC grad student, surprises his southern conservative family at Thanksgiving when he brings home his African-American boyfriend.

The Best Experimental Film was presented to The Color of Time directed by Anthony Szulc (USA).
Synopsis: The Color of Time, a collaboration between painter/sculptor Carol Brown Goldberg and filmmaker Anthony Szulc is an 11 minute 'Documoir' exploration of color, memory, art, history, family, poetry, and human imagination.

The Best British Film was presented to Turn a Blind Eye directed by Harold Salakianathan (United Kingdom).
Synopsis: A city trader incriminates himself amidst the protests against the global financial crisis.

The Best Director was presented to Aurelia directed by Victor Ghizaru (Canada).
Synopsis: Aurelia embarks on a journey to find her father. Cut off from the world, she naïvely discovers simple things that marvel her infant spirit. A peaceful story about self-discovery, taking place in the empty fields of a forgotten land.

The Cinematic Vision Award was presented to Ghost Track directed by Fabrizio Rossetti (Spain).
Synopsis: Isabel is a cleaner who dreams of being a singer. She owns an Ipod, within which there are six women, each of whom, like Isabel, represent a musical note. Each woman is the protagonist of a different story connected to the path Isabel must take.

The Best Web Video was presented to Ian Wright / Nothing to Something directed by Marcel Beckford (United Kingdom).
Synopsis: This detailed account documents the rise of a young black boy from the harder side of South East London, who rose through all adversity to become the highest scoring player for Arsenal Football Club.

The Best Comedic Film was presented to Womble directed by Robert Pirouet (United Kingdom).
Synopsis: Years have passed and what's changed? Jim Labey sits waiting in the corridor of his old school waiting for a job interview. The problem? The other side of the desk is Piers Mourant, an old classmate of Jim's, and Pier's remembers everything.

The Best First-Time Director was presented to Beauty and the Breast directed by Liliana Komorowska (Canada).
Synopsis: A first-time documentary filmmaker offers a compelling insight into the devastating reality of breast cancer, as seen through the eyes of several female patients helping demystify the deadly disease while painting poignant and often humorous intimate

Feature Screenplay Competition Winners

Grand Prize Winner was awarded to Russian Cross written by Brian Moniz.

Second Place Screenplay was awarded to Safewood written by Zoe Mavroudi.

Third Place Screenplay was awarded to Seeing Red written by Sundae Jahant-Osborn.

Fourth Place Screenplay was awarded to Smilers written by Mike McGeever.

Fifth Place Screenplay was awarded to Crater written by Luke Pimental.

Short Screenplay Competition Winners

First Place Screenplay was awarded to El Jardinero written by Stefano Valentini.

Second Place Screenplay was awarded to Path written by Michael Wright.

Third Place Screenplay was awarded to GodsStorm written by Loren Sterman.

The Best Stage Play was presented to The City of Burning Bridges written by Ivana Jajalo.

The Best First-Time Screenwriter was presented to Sea Fever written by Neasa Hardiman.

The Best Television Pilot was presented to Grey Matters written by Ian Longacre.

About the London Film Awards:
As a distinguished international film competition, the London Film Awards celebrates and awards independent film's best and brightest talent spanning the globe. The London Film Awards places an emphasis on exclusivity and recognizes and awards only the most finely produced films and screenplays with honors. The Grand Prize Winners of each official competition category, as determined by our Official Jury, each receive the coveted Gold Lion Award as commemoration of their exemplary achievements. Additionally, the London Film Awards offers various Special Achievement Awards for standout productions.

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Joey Paulos
London Film Awards
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