ERASE Racism Ends the Year with Two New Grants for Fair Housing Advocacy

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The Ford Foundation and Community Advocates have awarded ERASE Racism, a NY civil rights non-profit, with two grants totaling $175,000 to develop and pursue strategies that will reduce residential segregation.

ERASE Racism

Now, more than ever, this work is of critical importance; with a rapidly changing racial demographic we must address discriminatory policies and practices that have segregated, marginalized, and disenfranchised people of color.

The Ford Foundation recently granted ERASE Racism, a NY civil rights non-profit, $150,000 to lead a New York Metro area inclusionary housing task force and to identify strategies to promote fair housing. One of Ford’s issue areas is “Metropolitan Opportunity”, which seeks to help low-income families in metropolitan areas move toward financial stability and security through the development of homes that are linked to public transportation, good schools, secure employment, and help provide innovative finance tools to purchase and maintain them. ERASE Racism will work with other members of the task force to develop strategies aimed at reducing residential segregation and increasing the regional supply of affordable housing in ways that expand the range of quality housing choices available to low income individuals and families, in particular people of color.

Additionally, Community Advocates, a Long Island non-profit with a 40-year history as a catalyst for social justice and racial equity, particularly in housing, has granted ERASE Racism a $25,000 grant to promote non-discriminatory housing choices in Long Island, New York.

When asked about the significance of these two fair housing grants, Elaine Gross, President of ERASE Racism, responded, “Now, more than ever, this work is of critical importance; with a rapidly changing racial demographic we must address discriminatory policies and practices that have segregated, marginalized, and disenfranchised people of color. Additionally, black and brown children need to be given access to neighborhoods that will provide them with the best opportunities to succeed and contribute to our society, including high performing schools. That is why, when we talk about the need for affordable housing we must also ensure that it is not built in a way that will perpetuate segregation and increase concentrated poverty.” Ms. Gross further explained that through strategically placing affordable housing in high opportunity, white neighborhoods we can begin to promote racial integration and diminish the myriad of problems caused by segregation, which is a win-win for everyone.

To find out more about ERASE Racism’s Housing Project, please visit the housing page on their website http://www.eraseracismny.org

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Elaine Gross
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