Internet Marketing Firm Releases a New Edition of “fishbat Splash” Discussing Social Media War Between Twitter and Facebook

The series of videos aims to keep people updated on digital news. The most recent video discusses the competition between Facebook and Twitter.

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Bohemia, NY (PRWEB) December 29, 2012

On December 29, fishbat released a new edition of “fishbat splash,” this time focusing on the ongoing “social media war” between Facebook and Twitter.

In the video, Scott Darrohn - CEO of the online marketing firm fishbat - discussed the jabs that the two social media sites have taken at each other recently. “We all know that Twitter and Facebook are often at each other’s throats, and recently the Facebook-owned photo app Instagram announced it severed the use of Twitter cards,” Darrohn said.

Twitter cards allow Instagram pictures to be displayed properly on mobile Twitter feeds. “So if you’re wondering why that unflattering picture of your friend passed out and drooling on the couch after a holiday booze-fest appears cropped on your mobile Twitter feed, now you know why.”

While some are referring to this as a social media war, Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom said that he only disabled Twitter cards in order to direct more traffic directly to the new Instagram website, and that it really had nothing to do with taking a proverbial jab at Twitter. But this could be a strategy to get back at the company since it restricted Instagram’s ability to access a user’s Twitter followers.

There is sure to be more news in this “tit-for-tat” that seems to be going on between Twitter and Facebook, and fishbat will stay updated on this and all digital marketing news.

fishbat, Inc. is a full service online marketing firm. Through social media management, search engine optimization (SEO), web design, and public relations, fishbat strives as a marketing firm to raise awareness about your brand and strengthen your corporate image.

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