Doctors Health Press Reports on Study: Keeping Lost Weight Off Could Be More Important for Heart Health than Losing It

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Doctors Health Press, a division of Lombardi Publishing Corporation, and publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new study that indicates keeping lost weight off might be more important than losing it in the first place.

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Doctors Health Press Reports on Study: Keeping Lost Weight Off Could Be More Important for Heart Health than Losing It

The Secret to Healthy Weight Loss.

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Doctors Health Press, a division of Lombardi Publishing Corporation, and publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new study that indicates keeping lost weight off might be more important than losing it in the first place.

As Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/food-and-nutrition-articles/the-secret-to-healthy-weight-loss) notes, while everyone talks about weight loss, the fact that is often missed is that it’s just as essential to keep the weight off. According to this new study, weight that has been lost and returned could be more harmful to the cardiovascular system.

As the article “The Secret to Healthy Weight Loss” reports, researchers at Wake Forest University studied 112 obese, postmenopausal women, and discovered that gaining weight back after intentionally losing it was linked to poor effects on their hearts over the long term. The negative effects were seen in the test subjects’ blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting glucose, and insulin—the main factors that turn into risk factors for diabetes and heart disease.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article notes that postmenopausal women can derive great benefits from actively trying to lose weight. But, the vast majority of them have trouble keeping lost weight off, which is a danger in itself. In fact, for this study, women who had regained weight within one year had worse risk factors than before they lost weight. This suggests the fluctuation of body weight exerted negative health effects.

The article outlines the study’s five-month-long weight loss plan, which was followed by a year-long intervention period. Researchers found that the women had great initial success, losing an average of 25 pounds. After the full study period, two-thirds of them regained at least four pounds of weight. On average, they regained 70% of the weight they had lost.

As the Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article concludes, when anyone loses weight, he or she must do so through a lifestyle switch that can be sustained. Slow weight loss over many months is the healthiest method, since incremental change is easier to maintain.

(SOURCE: Beavers, D., et al., “Cardiometabolic Risk After Weight Loss and Subsequent Weight Regain in Overweight and Obese Postmenopausal Women,” J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. Published online November 26, 2012.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs, and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

Doctors Health Press believes in the healing properties of various alternative remedies, including Traditional Chinese Medicine. To see a video outlining the Doctors Health Press’ views on Traditional Chinese Medicine, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/chinesemedicine.

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