Popular Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin Supports Study that Frying Foods in Certain Oils has No Negative Health Effects

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is lending its support to a study showing that fried foods may not be bad for the heart, depending on which type of oil is used.

frying foods in certain oils has no negative health effects

Frying Foods in Certain Oils Has No Negative Health Effects

They found no association between the large amounts of fried foods eaten and the risk of heart disease or death.

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is lending its support to a study showing that fried foods may not be bad for the heart, depending on which type of oil is used.

As reported in the Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin on Monday, January 30, 2012 (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/food-and-nutrition-articles/is-there-such-a-thing-as-healthy-fried-foods), Spanish researchers have determined that cooking in olive or sunflower oil is not linked to heart disease or premature death.

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin reports that, for their study, the researchers examined the cooking habits and health of nearly 41,000 adults, aged 29 to 69. None of the participants had heart disease at the start of the study, which lasted 11 years. The participants were divided into four groups depending on how much fried food they consumed.

The researchers found that there were 606 heart-disease-related events and 1,134 deaths during the study follow-up period, Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin. They found no association between the large amounts of fried foods eaten and the risk of heart disease or death.

According to Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, in Spain, olive and sunflower oil are used for cooking, so the researchers’ results are based on these preferences. They caution that results taken in other countries may differ if the same types of oil are not used. Food fried in a solid oil like butter and/or re-used oils such as those commonly found in fast food restaurants have a different effect on the nutritional value of a particular food. This is because the food will absorb more oil and increase the calories of the food. It is also true that frying in saturated fat is less healthy than using monounsaturated fats like olive oil.

(SOURCE: Guallar-Castillon, P., et al., "Consumption of fried foods and risk of coronary heart disease: Spanish cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study," BMJ, Jan. 23, 2012; 344: e363.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on the Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

David Juan, MD, is the editor of The Vitamin Doctor newsletter that reveals some of the inside facts, including potential hazards, of today's popular world of vitamins and supplements. The Vitamin Doctor has released a new video revealing the foods that can have negative consequences when mixed with popular supplements. To see the video, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/foods-never-to-mix.

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