Treatment for Hip Conditions Should Not Rest Solely on MRI Scans, Say Researchers

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When it comes to treating people with hip pain, physicians should not replace clinical observation with the use of magnetic resonance images (MRI), according to research being presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day in San Francisco, CA.

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Our results emphasize the importance of correlating clinical signs and symptoms with imaging findings when considering surgery for patients with these conditions.

When it comes to treating people with hip pain, physicians should not replace clinical observation with the use of magnetic resonance images (MRI), according to research being presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day in San Francisco, CA.

“We performed MRI scans on a sample of volunteers without any hip pain, and discovered about 73% had abnormal findings,” commented the study’s lead author Bradley C. Register, MD, of the Steadman-Philippon Research Institute.

The study evaluated forty-five volunteer subjects with no history of hip pain, symptoms, injury or previous surgeries. Each participant received an MRI scan which was reviewed by three separate radiologists. Scans identified labral tears as the most common of the abnormalities displayed, making up nearly 69% of the joint conditions. Subjects older than 35 were more prone to abnormalities, showing a 13.7 times greater likelihood of having chondral defects and 16.7 times greater chance of having a subchondral cyst.

“The hope with a study like this is improved treatment and decision-making for physicians who are dealing with hip disorders,” noted Register. “Our results emphasize the importance of correlating clinical signs and symptoms with imaging findings when considering surgery for patients with these conditions.”

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) is a world leader in sports medicine education, research, communication and fellowship, and includes national and international orthopaedic sports medicine leaders. The Society works closely with many other sports medicine specialists, including athletic trainers, physical therapists, family physicians, and others to improve the identification, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports injuries. AOSSM is also a founding partner of the STOP Sports Injuries campaign to prevent overuse and traumatic injuries in kids. For more information on AOSSM or the STOP Sports Injuries campaign, visit http://www.sportsmed.org or http://www.stopsportsinjuries.org

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