“Do Not Be Afraid To Profile” for Spotting Potential Danger Explains the Recent Absolute Rights Newsletter

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The recent Absolute Rights newsletter reveals a variety of ways to use profiling to help spot potential dangers.

Spotting Potential Dangers AbsoluteRights.com

Spotting Potential Dangers AbsoluteRights.com

Always assume everyone is armed until there is a reason to be satisfied they are not.

Profiling isn't foolproof, explains the recent Absolute Rights newsletter, but it does tip the odds in favor of spotting potential dangers. There are a variety of ways to use profiling, the main key is by being very observant of surroundings, says the Absolute Rights newsletter.

A few things to look for, explains the Absolute Rights newsletter, are face, neck, and hand tattoos, especially tear drops or "mean" looking tattoos. Keep in mind that tattoos are permanent, so the tattoos could be a reminder from a former lifestyle, reveals the Absolute Rights newsletter. Just because someone still has gang and prison tats from their younger years, does not necessarily mean they are still dangerous threats, explains the recent Absolute Rights newsletter.

Red or blue bandannas, specifically worn on the head, on the arm, or hanging out of a waist band or pocket, can be a gang sign, warns the current Absolute Rights newsletter. Remember to put these signs in perspective with the surroundings, because bandannas are great survival tools and lots of people carry them, explains the Absolute Rights newsletter.

The fact is that most violent criminals are young males who dress like street thugs, so being aware of people’s attire can be very helpful in signalling dangerous situations, explains the recent Absolute Rights newsletter. It is important to be observant to prevent potential dangerous situations, because criminals, law enforcement, military, and preppers all have the trait of being more aware of what's going on around them than the average person, reveals the Absolute Right newsletter. If someone is obviously aware of what's going on around them, there's a pretty good chance that they're either a potential ally or potential enemy and worth further examination, explains the recent Absolute Right newsletter.

People's responses to authority can be a good way to spot potential danger, explains the recent Absolute Rights newsletter, so when uniformed law enforcement enters a crowded room, try to look at the facial expressions of others in the room to notice what a polarizing effect they have.

The bottom line is this, explains the recent Absolute Rights newsletter, always assume everyone is armed until there is a reason to be satisfied they are not. Anyone exhibiting any of the cues described above, the newsletter reveals, is considered a possible threat until there is reason to be comfortable they are not carrying a concealed weapon.

The Absolute Rights newsletter provides relevant information about how to be prepared for survival in any situation. To get this important survival information, plus for a limited time a bonus of “The First 72 Hour Disaster Manual” eReport, subscribe now to the Absolute Rights newsletter.

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Jon Tarr
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