Doctors Health Press Supports Study Connecting Heart Disease and Prostate Cancer

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is lending its support to a new study that makes a connection between heart disease and prostate cancer.

doctors health press supports study connecting heart disease and prostate cancer

Doctors Health Press Supports Study Connecting Heart Disease and Prostate Cancer

Having coronary artery disease increased the men's risk of prostate cancer by 35%. This risk kept rising as time went on.

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is lending its support to a new study that makes a connection between heart disease and prostate cancer.

As reported in Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin on Monday, February 13, 2012 (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/heart-health-articles/the-link-between-heart-problems-and-your-prostate), researchers at Duke University found a significant link between coronary artery disease and prostate cancer. They believe the two conditions may have shared causes.

According to the Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article, coronary artery disease kills more adults in the U.S. than any other cause, accounting for one in four deaths. Risk factors include inactivity, obesity, high blood pressure and cholesterol, cigarette smoking, and diabetes.

Similarly, says the article, prostate cancer is a common killer. It's the second-most lethal cancer for U.S. men, behind lung cancer, with about 240,000 new cases diagnosed a year, and 34,000 deaths. Previous studies exploring the relationship between coronary artery disease and prostate cancer risk have found conflicting results.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that, in the current study, the Duke team used data from 6,390 men enrolled in a large study to test the prostate cancer risk reduction benefits of a drug. All participants had a prostate biopsy at the two- and four-year marks. They also provided a detailed medical history that included their weight, incidence of heart disease, alcohol intake, medication use, and other factors.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article also reports that, among the men in the study, 547 reported a history of coronary artery disease. This group of men tended to be older, heavier, and less healthy, with higher baseline PSA levels (used to predict prostate cancer), plus more incidences of diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. These men were much more likely to develop prostate cancer, even after accounting for everything else.

Having coronary artery disease increased the men's risk of prostate cancer by 35%. This risk kept rising as time went on. The group was 24% more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer within the first two years of the study than men who reported no heart disease. By four years into the study, this group's prostate cancer risk was 74% higher.

According to the Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article, what researchers don't yet know is what is causing the link. But the connection is quite strong and is very much worth considering for all men who suffer coronary artery disease.

(SOURCE: "Heart disease may be a risk factor for prostate cancer,"
Duke University Medical Center, Feb. 8, 2012.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

Victor Marchione, MD is the Chairman of the Doctors Health Press Editorial Board. He is also the editor of The Food Doctor and has released a new video revealing 12 fighting foods to help virtually all of your current health problems. To see the video, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/12-fighting-foods.

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