Homeserve Publish Handy Hints to Help Britain’s Homes

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HomeServe – Britain’s home emergency specialists – are providing handy hints to help tackle everyday problems within the home.

HomeServe Support Marie Curie
Limescale is the bane of many a kitchen or bathroom It doesn’t just look bad, or make your tea taste bad. If it’s left too long it can build up and cause blockages, corrode fixtures and damage appliances – especially in hard water areas.

HomeServe, the national emergency home repair service, are providing useful handy hints to help tackle everyday problems within the home. The latest help and advice addresses the nuisance that can be limescale build up.

“Limescale is the bane of many a kitchen or bathroom,” says John Hancock, DIY guru at HomeServe. “It doesn’t just look bad, or make your tea taste bad. If it’s left too long it can build up and cause blockages, corrode fixtures and damage appliances – especially in hard water areas.”

What causes limescale?

It’s not just expensive bottled mineral water that has naturally occurring minerals in it. Your tap water does, too. But when water is heated, the minerals in the water react with the heat and become insoluble – the opposite of dissolving a spoonful of tea in your cooking water. It’s this that forms limescale.

How to deal with limescale

Whether you want sparkling clean appliances, a shower with some power, or just a nice cup of tea, here are a few handy hints to banish limescale for good.

For showerheads

Shower heads are often blocked by limescale, reducing your shower to a trickle. To descale it, pull it down and place in a resealable sandwich bag filled with white vinegar. Keep it in place with an elastic band and leave for a few hours or overnight to let the vinegar breakdown any build-up inside the head. Then simply run cold water through to rinse and scrub any remaining limescale from the outside with an old toothbrush.

For unsightly taps

Taps are tricky to rid of limescale as whatever you use needs to be in direct contact with the affected area for some time, which can create tarnishes or scratches. The best solution is lemon. Cut one in half and push it onto the spout of your tap, twisting as if you were squeezing it until it holds in place and doesn’t fall. If you can’t get the lemon to stay where it’s needed, wrap a tea towel around both the lemon and tap and leave for a few hours to do its job. The acid in the lemon will dissolve the limescale without harming the metal – and leave a fresh smell. Use cotton wool dipped generously in lemon juice for other hard to reach tap areas.

Descaling your kettle

We all hate having that last cup of tea from a kettle coated with limescale, with flakes of the stuff floating in top. Prevent it by filling your kettle a quarter full with vinegar or lemon juice. After leaving for an hour, top up the kettle with water, boil then rinse with cold water. This method can also be used to descale coffee makers by adding vinegar to the water compartment and topping it up with water before running. Rinse twice with cold water.

About HomeServe

HomeServe is a national home emergency repair service backed by a 24-hour claims handling and repair network. For more information on how HomeServe can help you call 0800 923 8016 or visit the DIY help and advice section of the HomeServe website for more handy hints.

Contact information

For more media information please contact: homeserve(at)bpconsumer(dot)co(dot)uk.

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Diane Jones
HomeServe
01922 659 731
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