Garden Media Group Releases Top New Garden Plants & Products That are Superstars for Spring 2012

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Low maintenance plants and sustainable garden products ensure garden success this spring from Garden Media Group.

Hines Growers Buddleia Lavender Veil attracts wildlife to your garden

The new Garden Superstars will inspire novices and seasoned gardeners to create the garden of their dreams with a nod to being a good steward for Mother Nature

Garden Media Group trend spotters has released its top Garden Superstars for Spring. The list includes new plants, products and professionals to put it all together this Spring for gardening success.

“Today’s tuned in consumer wants it all,” says Susan McCoy, gardening expert for the Philadelphia area firm. “They want long-blooming color, easy to grow, low maintenance plants that are great performers and environmentally friendly products.”

McCoy has long stated, “Just plant something!” She proclaims the new Garden Superstars “will inspire novices and seasoned gardeners to create the garden of their dreams with a nod to being a good steward for Mother Nature.”

Bold colors are back. Look on any fashion page and a bold color palette dominates. “Colors like purple and orange are showing up in many home gardens,” says McCoy. She likes the new Bloomtastic! dwarf butterfly bushes, Buddleia Lavender Veil and Purple Splendor, from Hines Growers These compact, easy to grow, low maintenance plants are perfect in containers and hanging baskets or mass planted in the landscape. “The butterflies and hummingbirds love the profuse, richly-colored and very fragrant blooms.”

Heartfelt repellents. McCoy says the number one complaint besides planting the wrong plants in your garden is pesky animals and pets that can ruin landscapes. “Deer and rabbits in my area devour plants and empty birdfeeders.” She says instead of toxic chemicals, she’s using an easy, humane animal repellent to protect her property. McCoy likes the new high-tech Spray Away motion-activated sprinklers from Havahart®. “It detects the animal’s heat and movement and sprays a short burst of water up to 1000 square feet that chases away unwanted pets and animals.” These and other eco-friendly animal repellents are available at Havahart.com.

Problem solved. McCoy says stink bugs are a national problem and a year-round pest infestation, particularly from the Mid-Atlantic to the Mississippi River. “When they wake up in spring, stink bugs go outdoors to mate and eat everything from berries to tomatoes and your favorite shrubs and plants!” McCoy explains that gardeners want natural insect repellents to battle stink bugs instead of toxic chemicals. She recommends the new safe and effective RESCUE! Stink Bug Traps that releases an odorless pheromone powerful enough to lure stink bugs from up to 30 feet. The outdoor trap should be set up as soon as trees start to leaf out to break the cycle and catch stink bugs before they begin to mate.

Paradise Found. McCoy loves bringing paradise home with Costa Farms’ new Tropic Escape hibiscus. The over-sized flowers come in more than a dozen hot, showcase tropical colors like Caribbean Cocktail yellow, Tiki Temptation orange, Monsoon Mixer pink and lavender. “These easy care hibiscus bloom twice as long as old-fashioned hibiscus and can take the heat in sunny locations,” says McCoy. She adds, “Tropic Escape hibiscus adds tropical punch to any outdoor décor or party through the hottest summer months.” To see the entire collection, visit Costafarms.com.

Back to nature. “Working with nature, combining dynamic plant colors and natural contours, is a big trend in landscape design,” says McCoy. She says that professional landscape designers like Margie Grace, Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD) member and recent International Landscape Designer of the Year, can help you select natural stone, reclaimed materials and native and low-maintenance plants to bring life to your garden. To find a professional landscape designer, check out APLD’s website APLD.org.

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Lynne Whelan
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