Texas Independence Day Events Draw Patriotic Citizens

Share Article

History and Politics Mingle in Central Texas

Texas Capitol

"This year we should have a great turnout. It's an election year, and with the delay in the primary date, the whole state is abuzz with excitement and anticipation."

Steeped in tradition, the anniversary of the establishment of the Republic of Texas in 1836 promises to draw people of all backgrounds who share in the pride of calling Texas home. Today marks the day that Texas formally split from Mexico and where ideas about being the Lone Star State are rooted. It wasn't until nearly ten years later that Texas officially joined the United States, and that legacy remains in the collective consciousness of the citizens.

Due mainly to the ongoing war for independence, five sites served as temporary capitals of Texas in 1836: Washington-on-the-Brazos, Harrisburg, Galveston, Velasco and Columbia. The capital was moved to the new city of Houston in 1837. In 1839, the capital was moved again to a tiny frontier settlement on the Colorado River named Waterloo. A new city was laid out, and Waterloo was renamed Austin.

Austinites are incredibly proud to call their home-city the capital of the Lone Star State and to commemorate the anniversary of Texas' independence. Events in Austin include a celebration at the Capitol building around noon, as well as a parade up Congress Avenue early Saturday morning. "This year we should have a great turnout," remarks local candidate Vik Vad, running for the Travis County Tax Office. "It's an election year, and with the delay in the primary date, the whole state is abuzz with excitement and anticipation."

In the evening, Karl Rove, Senior Advisor to former President George W. Bush, will be speaking at the Austin Country Club. "Very few people understand political campaigns and campaign strategy better than Karl Rove," states Vad. "It will be an honor to hear him speak."

Whether participating actively at an event, or celebrating quietly in the privacy of their homes, patriotic Texans don't forget the rich history surrounding their state, even 176 years after it happened.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Nikhil Kulkarni

(512) 665-0545
Email >