Arizona Car Accident Lawyer Cites New UCLA Study Linking Brain Injuries to Anxiety Disorders

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Phoenix personal injury attorney Van O’Steen is warning people with even minor head injuries to be aware of a link between these injuries and an increased risk of developing anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A recently published study report by scientists at UCLA provides new evidence for a causal connection between brain injuries and PTSD-like medical conditions. The study was published last month in the professional journal Biological Psychiatry.

Van O'Steen

A person who is involved in an automobile collision or other accident may strike his or her head against a hard object. The new UCLA study demonstrates the importance of prompt medical evaluation and treatment for these victims.

Phoenix personal injury attorney Van O’Steen is warning people with even minor head injuries to be aware of a link between these injuries and an increased risk of developing anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A recently published study report by scientists at UCLA provides new evidence for a causal connection between brain injuries and PTSD-like medical conditions. The study was published last month in the professional journal Biological Psychiatry.

The UCLA research was conducted using rats, but the nature of the findings suggest that humans are likely to be similarly affected, and that even mild brain injuries cause victims to be more susceptible to developing unreasonably strong fears, a characteristic of anxiety disorders such as PTSD.

“A person who is involved in an automobile collision or other accident may strike his or her head against a hard object,” O’Steen said. “The new UCLA study demonstrates the importance of prompt medical evaluation and treatment for these victims,” he added.

O’Steen said that some brain injured people may not be aware that they struck their heads in an accident if the trauma caused them to black out. He advises all who suffered a blow to the head or experienced black outs to seek expert medical attention.

“In the course of our representation of accident victims, we often work with neurologists and neuropsychologists to fully assess the nature and extent of any brain injury, and we help our clients obtain the money necessary for treatment,” O’Steen said. “Management of stress and other symptoms associated with brain injury are essential to maintaining good mental health.”

O’Steen warns accident victims that even a mild brain injury may be more impactful on one’s quality of life than other obvious physical injuries. “Head injured people must not disregard this critical aspect of their medical care,” he concluded.

RESOURCES: “Concussive Brain Injury Enhances Fear Learning and Excitatory Processes in the Amygdala” by Maxine L. Reger, Andrew M. Poulos, Floyd Buen, Christopher C. Giza, David A. Hovda, and Michael S. Fanselow, Biological Psychiatry, Volume 71, Issue 4 (February 15, 2012.

About O’Steen & Harrison, PLC

O’Steen & Harrison, PLC has protected the rights of injured accident victims and their family members since 1974. The firm concentrates on personal injury, medical malpractice and dangerous products with a special emphasis on harmful drugs and defective medical devices. O’Steen & Harrison is av-rated (the highest rating) by the prestigious Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory. The firm’s attorneys have recovered more than $3 billion dollars for clients. O’Steen & Harrison offers free, confidential consultations to those who have been injured. Call toll free 1-800-883-8888 or see our website at http://www.vanosteen.com.

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