Sewell Announces the Release of an Informational Video About New HDMI Standards

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Sewell today announces efforts in dispelling confusion over the new HDMI standard with a high quality video produced in-house.

"Hopefully this video will serve to dispell confusion in layman's terms about what the consumer is getting with version 1.4 cables, switches, and splitters, and whether or not the increased cost is even worth it," said Scott from Sewell's video team.

Recently the HDMI organization released a new standard of HDMI called version 1.4. The problem that the HDMI organization has run into in the past when version 1.3 was released was that many retailers and manufacturers tried to pass hardware off as 1.3 while only acheiving some of the numerous spec upgrades included with the new HDMI standard. For this reason, the HDMI organization has decided not to allow the use of their HDMI v1.4 trademark; instead retailers have to specify the product details in the title of their products. Sewell today announced a new video made by their video department that asks "what is HDMI 1.4?" and brings clarity to the many new names and specs that consumers will confront as they shop for their HDTV accessories.
"Hopefully this video will serve to dispell confusion about what the consumer is getting with version 1.4 cables, switches, and splitters in layman's terms, and whether or not the increased cost is even worth it," said Scott Dastrup, head of Sewell's video production team. The video took a few weeks to produce and the animation was all produced by Scott's team in-house. An informational article about HDMI 1.4 was also created to accompany the video.

Included in the new HDMI 1.4 standard are increased resolution capabilities (4000x2000 pixels), but special HDTVs are required to take advantage of the new resolution. Other features include increased bandwidth which can increase the frequency that the signal travels at, making it more resilient to interference, guaranteed 3D support, an audio return channel, an ethernet channel (aka HEC channel), and the introduction of a new smaller connector. All of this can be daunting to swallow, but Sewell's video seeks to make these new features understandable to the typical consumer, and in a timely fashion (the video is about 4 minutes).

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Cameron Postelwait
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