Birmingham Maple Clinic Reports Strong Mental Component in Treating Teen Obesity

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According to a recent study from Purdue, the majority of obese teenage girls who lose weight continue to view themselves as overweight, signalling the need for both mental and physical care for teens in weight loss programs.

Tackling childhood obesity has become an extremely important initiative in the US, but what we tend to forget is that there is a large mental component that goes along with gaining and losing weight, no matter how old the patient is.

Birmingham Maple Clinic, offering mental health treatment in Michigan, recently reported on the surprising results of a recent study from Purdue University, which found that a majority of obese teenage girls who lose a significant amount of their body mass continue to view themselves as overweight. The clinic, citing a story published on Psych Central, announced that the results are indicative of how critical it is when treating obesity in teens to ensure that they receive both mental health care and physical monitoring while they work towards reaching a healthier weight through diet and exercise. As reported by Lori Edelson, clinic spokeswoman and mental health specialist, “Tackling childhood obesity has become an extremely important initiative in the US, but what we tend to forget is that there is a large mental component that goes along with gaining and losing weight, no matter how old the patient is. Since teenage girls are especially susceptible to developing eating disorders, it’s crucial to include mental health treatment when treating both obese and underweight patients."

According to the experts at the Birmingham Maple Clinic, which offers treatment for eating disorders and body dysmorphic disorders in both children and adults, just because a teen has lost weight and reached their weight loss goals, the low self esteem and other psychological issues that developed when they were obese tend to stick around. Edelson added, “The Purdue study confirms what we have always advocated, which is that in order for treatment for eating disorders to be successful, whether it is for compulsive overeating or anorexia, it should include both mental health treatment and physical monitoring.”

Birmingham Maple Clinic has been specializing in mental health services in Michigan for over 30 years, providing services for individuals, couples, families, groups and the community. The clinic provides treatment for a variety of psychological conditions, including child and adult ADHD, anxiety and panic disorders, chronic illness, depression, grief and loss, eating disorders, substance abuse, sexual addiction, post traumatic stress disorder and marriage, family and relationship counseling. For more information, please visit http://www.birminghammaple.com.

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Lori Edelson