DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on New Exercise Technique Designed to Assist Older Adults

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a study that shows assisted cycling could help older, sedentary adults exercise and get active.

doctorshealthpress.com reports on new exercise technique designed to assist older adults

DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on New Exercise Technique Designed to Assist Older Adults

They found that power output, heart rate, oxygen uptake, and respiratory exchange ratio were all lower in the assisted cycling group. The mean speed, however, was higher than the group cycling without assistance.

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a study that shows assisted cycling could help older, sedentary adults exercise and get active.

As reported in the Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin on Thursday, April 5, 2012 (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/weight-loss-articles/exercise-articles/try-this-activity-to-motivate-yourself-to-exercise), German researchers at the University of Wuppertal ran a study on the merits of assisted cycling.

Assisted cycling is simply a bicycle that is capable of taking over when you become temporarily tired. Assisted bicycles can also simulate various terrains, increasing the force needed to pedal -- for example -- as if you were bicycling up a hill.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin reports that the researchers at the Department of Sport Science recruited eight sedentary women, aged 38 to 53, to participate in their study. The women cycled 9.5 kilometers on varying terrain at their own pace, once with and once without motorized assistance. The researchers then compared the effects of both types of cycling.

They found that power output, heart rate, oxygen uptake and respiratory exchange ratio were all lower in the assisted cycling group. The mean speed, however, was higher than the group cycling without assistance. In addition, motorized cycling was associated with the following:

  •     Lower electromyography (muscle activity) with higher output and speed
  •     Less cardiorespiratory and metabolic effort
  •     Lower rate of perceived exertion with more enjoyment
  •     Sufficient energy expenditure to provide health benefits

The researchers concluded that electrically assisted cycling could represent an innovative approach to persuading reluctant sedentary women to exercise.

(SOURCE: "Biomechanical, cardiorespiratory, metabolic and perceived responses to electrically assisted cycling," Eur. J. Appl. Physiol., Mar. 24, 2012.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on the Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

David Juan, MD, is the editor of The Vitamin Doctor newsletter that reveals some of the inside facts, including potential hazards, of today's popular world of vitamins and supplements. The Vitamin Doctor has released a new video revealing the foods that can have negative consequences when mixed with popular supplements. To see the video, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/foods-never-to-mix.

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