Wartime Reflections Festival Starts Monday: Remarkable UT/TSO Collaboration a “Gift to the Community”

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The University of Toledo College of Visual and Performing Arts and the Toledo Symphony have partnered to present a fascinating and diverse series of events in April 2012.

“The amazing faculty at the University of Toledo have prepared a wonderful array of events that perfectly contextualize the way artists deal with the pain of wartime,” says Toledo Symphony President and CEO Kathleen Carroll.

The University of Toledo College of Visual and Performing Arts and the Toledo Symphony have partnered to present a fascinating and diverse series of events in April 2012.

The community is invited to explore the ways artists have dealt with the pain of loss since the Civil War. This inspiring and thought-provoking series of events begins Monday, April 9 with “Jazz in Wartime” featuring the UT jazz faculty group CrossCurrents. The festival will conclude on the 27th and 28th of April with the symphony’s performance of “Wartime Reflections” at the Peristyle.

This arts and humanities collaboration is the first of its kind between the symphony and the college. All events are open to the public and most are free of charge. Highlights include a film screening, several performances and recitals, interactive multimedia presentations and historical lectures.

“The amazing faculty at the University of Toledo have prepared a wonderful array of events that perfectly contextualize the way artists deal with the pain of wartime,” says Toledo Symphony President and CEO Kathleen Carroll, “This is truly a gift to the community.”

The festival theme centers on the poignant concert that the symphony will perform in late April. This same program was performed at the 2011 Spring for Music festival in New York City (alongside the TSO Carnegie Hall debut). The Toledo Symphony wanted to bring back a “postcard” from the festival to share with Toledo audiences. The celebrated Wartime Reflections program, performed by the Oregon Symphony, was chosen for its depth of emotion, artistic intensity and inspiring theme. Works by Ives, Adams and Britten are performed on the first half back-to-back-to-back with no applause for emotional effect. The concert concludes with Vaughan-Williams’ haunting Fourth Symphony.

Tickets for the Jazz in Wartime event can be purchased at the door for $5. Tickets for the Toledo Symphony “Wartime Reflections” concert start at $15 and can be purchased by calling 419-246-8000 or visiting http://www.ToledoSymphony.com. All other events are free.

Jazz in Wartime
with Gunnar Mossblad & UT Jazz Faculty (CrossCurrents)
Monday, April 9, 7:30 – 8:30 pm
Crystal's Lounge @ the Ramada - 3536 Secor Road
$5 General Public, $3 Students & Seniors

The Big Band sound of the 30’s and 40’s was the soundtrack of daily life, and it served as an influence even for classical composers. Join the acclaimed UT Jazz Faculty group, CrossCurrents as they play their unique interpretations of some of the most influential and poignant music of this kind, reflecting the romance, the anguish and the political statements of Wartime.

Marching as to What? - Adams, Love, and Lightness
With Drs. Ben Pryor and Sara Lundquist, UT Departments of Philosophy and English
Wednesday, April 11, 7:30 pm
Libbey Hall, UT Main Campus
Free

This interactive, multimedia presentation will look at two of John Adams' compositions, "John Philip Sousa" and "The Wound-Dresser." "Sousa" is funny, irreverent, and strangely powerful, while Adams' setting of Whitman's "The Wound-Dresser" is serious, lyrical, and strangely "light." They are linked by their ambivalence toward war grounded in a uniquely American sensibility--exemplified by Walt Whitman--that this presentation will highlight. Audience members are invited to bring instruments (please, nothing bigger than a tuba, and nothing electronic). No talent required.

Rage and Remembrance: the British Musical Response to the Great War
with Dr. Christopher Williams, UT Department of Music
Wednesday, April 18th, 7:30 pm
Libbey Hall, UT Main Campus
Free

For the generation of British composers who came of age in the years leading up to the First World War, the brutality and devastation of that conflict came as a profound and embittering shock. The loss of so many promising young artists, including several fellow musicians and composers, led Vaughan Williams to pen, in his Fourth Symphony, a work of ferocious and unprecedented anger, and Benjamin Britten to author a unique work that would set the tone of fierce pacifism that would run throughout his entire career.

Derek Jarman’s War Requiem
with Tammy Kinsey, UT Department of Theatre
Friday, April 20th, 7:30 pm
Haigh Auditorium, Center for Visual Arts - 620 Grove Place
Free

Film professor Tammy Kinsey will introduce this screening of Jarman’s controversial visualization of Britten’s score. Utilizing no dialogue whatsoever, the film alternates between original dramatic scenes and archival footage of WWI. The film is set to Britten’s own 1963 rendition of the music, and is also notable for containing the last performance on stage or screen of Sir Lawrence Olivier.

Cabaret!
with Drs. Denise Ritter Bernardini and Michael Boyd, UT Department of Music
Sunday, April 22, 3:00 pm
Great Gallery, Toledo Museum of Art
Free

What is the sultry spin of the cabaret--its definition, its origins?

Take a musical adventure that begins in Paris, France on the streets of Montmartre during the late 19th Century. Then, travel to war torn Munich and Berlin to tour the Kabaretts, complete with bawdy satire to amuse and entertain. The concert will culminate with a modern look at American cabaret today, introducing some new music by Benjamin Moore. This concert is fun, educational and provocative!

Remembering the Civil War: Photographs and Monuments
with Dr. Richard Putney, UT Department of Art
Thursday, April 26, 7:30 pm
Libbey Hall, UT Main Campus
Free

An illustrated lecture devoted to memories of the Civil War provided by photographs and memorials, with emphasis on Alexander Gardiner’s Sketchbook of the Civil War (1866) and monuments dedicated at Gettysburg in the 1880s and 90s.
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Ashley Mirakian; Kristen Celek
Toledo Symphony
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