How To Stop Birds From "Attacking" Windows--Duncraft Answers.

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Spring is here and once again, Duncraft is receiving lots of calls about a strange, but very common phenomenon--birds repeatedly flying into windows, car mirrors or any other reflective surface. What is going on and how can it be stopped?

Cardinal "Attacking" A Window

Cardinal "Attacking" A Window

I had no idea why a cardinal was attacking my kitchen window until I called Duncraft and they told me why and what to do!--M. Connor, Duncraft Customer

Duncraft states that although female birds have been known to do this, it's mostly male birds that repeatedly fly into windows. The reason is simple. In spring all birds are staking out territories. Birds seldom allow other birds of the same species to share territories because too many of one species in an area depletes food sources and nesting locations.

A bird may tolerate a bird of a different species nesting nearby because the birds are after different nesting locations and different foods, but it won't tolerate another one of its own. When a male bird spots another male, a chasing fight will ensue. The dominate male gets the mate, the nesting location, the territory and the food in that area. A lot is at stake! When a bird happens to see its reflection in your window, or car mirror, it's seeing a bird of the same species in its territory--and that's not allowed. The bird will continuously attack until the other bird goes away. In nature, the other bird will indeed go away, but that reflection just stays there! Being persistent, the bird just continues to attack its own reflection.

So, how can this irritating behavior be stopped? Duncraft advises that homeowners block the reflection. The easiest way to do this is to put a piece of cardboard on the outside of the window where the bird is attacking. It may not look pretty, but it doesn't have to be done for long--only until the bird thinks the other bird has departed. As soon as the bird is mated and is busy with nest building and feeding nestlings, he'll calm down and won't be worried about intruders. Others of its species will be busy too, in territories of their own.

So, what initially seemed like a mystery turns out to be a simple, springtime response to a challenger bird--and it's easily remedied!

Founded in 1952 and located in Concord, New Hampshire, Duncraft’s objective is to bring the joy of backyard birding to wild bird lovers all across the country. Mike Dunn, owner and CEO is constantly inventing and searching for innovative ideas in bird feeding—giving bird lovers years of bird feeding enjoyment, success and satisfaction.
Duncraft
102 Fisherville Road
Concord, NH 03303
603-224-0200

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Roxanne Brune
Duncraft
800-763-7878 143
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