DoctorsHealthPress.com Supports Study Linking a Healthy Diet to Reversing a Worldwide Health Problem

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is lending its support to a new health study showing that a healthy diet can be a key factor in reversing the symptoms of metabolic syndrome.

doctorshealthpress.com supports study linking a healthy diet to reversing a worldwide health problem

DoctorsHealthPress.com Supports Study Linking a Healthy Diet to Reversing a Worldwide Health Problem

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that the research team found that all participants had decreases in body weight, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference during the two-month treatment.

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is lending its support to a new health study showing that a healthy diet can be a key factor in reversing the symptoms of metabolic syndrome.

As reported in Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin on Monday, April 9, 2012 (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/food-and-nutrition-articles/how-to-fight-metabolic-syndrome-and-win), Mexican researchers have found that a healthy diet could reverse the symptoms of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a worldwide health problem affecting millions. The condition can lead to serious health problems like heart disease and diabetes.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that in this latest study, researchers evaluated the effects of a dietary pattern on glucose intolerance and other measures related to metabolic syndrome, such as serum triglycerides. In this randomized trial, the participants ate their habitual diet, but had it reduced by 500 kilocalories for two weeks. They were then assigned to either a placebo group or a diet plan group. The diet plan added four specific foods to the participants’ diet: soy protein; nopal; chia seed; and oat.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that the research team found that all participants had decreases in body weight, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference during the two-month treatment. However, only the diet plan group showed decreases in serum triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP), and glucose intolerance. The research team concluded that the results from their study show that lifestyle interventions involving a specific diet plan for the treatment of metabolic syndrome could be effective. They also suggest that effectiveness could be even greater if local foods are used as part of the diet plan.

One of the foods used in this trial was nopal. Nopal is a vegetable commonly eaten in Mexico. These vegetables, also known as prickly pears, are an excellent source of insoluble and soluble fiber. They are also high in vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin K. Nopales have one special ability that could be of benefit to many in North America: the addition of these vegetables to a meal apparently reduces the glycemic effect of the foods eaten.

(SOURCE: Tovar, A.R., et al., "A dietary pattern including nopal, chia seed, soy protein, and oat reduces serum triglycerides and glucose intolerance in patients with metabolic syndrome," J. Nutr., Jan. 2012; 142(1): 64-9.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

Victor Marchione, MD is the Chairman of the Doctors Health Press Editorial Board. He is also the editor of The Food Doctor and has released a new video revealing 12 fighting foods to help virtually all of your current health problems. To see the video, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/12-fighting-foods.

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