Explore Tibet Team Introduces 6-day Cultural Tibet tours

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Explore Tibet Team, a professional Tibet travel agency providing the latest information on Tibet visa and Tibet trekking, introduces 6-day cultural Tibet tours of Lhasa, the historic and religious capital of Tibet. Explore Tibet Team says that Visitors will discover ancient temples, bustling markets, and art and architecture done in the traditional Tibetan style during their Tibet trip, all set against the beauty of the surrounding Himalaya Mountains.

Explore Tibet Team, a professional Tibet travel agency providing the latest information on Tibet visa and Tibet trekking, introduces 6-day cultural Tibet tours of Lhasa, the historic and religious capital of Tibet. Explore Tibet Team says that Visitors will discover ancient temples, bustling markets, and art and architecture done in the traditional Tibetan style during the Tibet trip, all set against the beauty of the surrounding Himalaya Mountains.

Lhasa was established in the 7th century by Songtsan Gampo, the first king to rule a unified Tibet. The city is located in the center of the Tibetan Plateau in a valley of the Kyi River, a tributary of the Yarlang Zangbo. At an altitude of about 3,600 meters, Lhasa is sunny year-round and has a semi-arid climate. Lhasa is the center of Tibetan commercial and spiritual life, luring merchants and pilgrims from all over Asia to participate in trade or religious festivals. The most important sites in Lhasa are Potala Palace, Jokhang Temple, the Barkhor market, and the monasteries of Sera and Drepung.

Built on Red Hill and rising 300 meters from the floor of the Lhasa Valley, the Potala Palace is the symbolic center of Tibetan life. It was built by the 5th Dalai Lama in the 17th century, and is named for Mt. Potalaka, the heavenly home of Chenrezig, the Buddha of Compassion. The palace has over 1,000 rooms in 13 stories and is the traditional home of the Dalai Lama and the seat of Tibetan government.

Jokhang Temple, considered the most sacred temple in Tibetan Buddhism, was constructed by Songtsan Gampo in the 7th century. The king’s two wives, one a princess from Nepal and the other a princess from the Tang dynasty court, each brought with them to Lhasa a statue of the Buddha as a child. These two holy relics are now housed in the Temple, frequently visited by scholars, pilgrims, and tourists. Outside Jokhang, Barkhor Street has been a thriving trade market since the end of the 17th century. A series of streets and a square around the Temple form the Barkhor circuit, a popular tourist destination and circumambulation route for pilgrims.

Sera and Drepung monasteries are two of the three most important religious and scholastic institutions of the Gelugpa sect of Tibetan Buddhism. Drepung, located at the foot of Mt. Gephel a short distance from Lhasa city, was once the world’s largest monastery, housing more than 10,000 monks. The Sera monastery, located just north of Lhasa, was built in the 15th century. It is renowned in the Buddhist world for the scholastic achievement of the monks who study there, and lively debates on the nature and principles of Buddhist philosophy occur in the traditional style on a daily basis.

Visitors to Lhasa can explore holy sites, temples, monasteries, markets and museums when they visit Tibet, and participate in activities that reflect the unique religion and culture of the Tibetan people.

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Sonam Jamphel