Local IT Business Owner Awarded Patent for Helping to Preserve Our Nation’s Records in the Centuries Ahead

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Paper records have been preserved for centuries. “But as we enter the digital age, the challenge is how to preserve digital records so that they can be accurately accessed in the unknown information eras of the decades and centuries to come,” explains Rick Rogers, president of the Frederick, MD-based Fenestra Technologies Corporation. Rogers was recently awarded a patent for contributing to a method of doing that very thing.

It’s incredibly important that we preserve these and a multitude of stories that tell the lives of our people and our nation for future generations, and that we do it in a way that the technology never becomes inaccessible.

Those who have parents, grandparents or ancestors who served in our nation’s wars, even dating back to the Civil War, have long relied on the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) to preserve the record of where and when the their family members served. U.S. Citizens have also utilized on our nation’s record-keeper for naturalization records of our immigrant ancestors.

Paper records have been preserved for centuries. “But as we enter the digital age, the challenge is how to preserve digital records so that they can be accurately accessed in the unknown information eras of the decades and centuries to come,” explains Rick Rogers, president of the Frederick, MD-based Fenestra Technologies Corporation. Rogers was recently awarded a patent for contributing to a method of doing that very thing.

“To me, it comes down to a personal level. For example, Cory Arant, son of our office manager, Lisa, served with the Marines in Iraq in 2008 as an Amphibious Assault Repair Technician,” explains Rogers. “The challenge is to ensure that Cory’s descendants 200 years from now can look him up and access the record of his service,” says Rogers.

“It’s incredibly important that we preserve these and a multitude of stories that tell the lives of our people and our nation for future generations, and that we do it in a way that the technology never becomes inaccessible."

“This latest patent is for a method of digitally preserving an electronic record that includes defining a preservation and service plan in a model, including access requirements and authenticity requirements,” explained Rogers.

“Because we don’t know what the future of digital technology holds, we created a flexible framework that can be added to and adapted over time,” added Rogers.

The patent was awarded jointly with Lockheed Martin Corporation, with whom Fenestra is a subcontractor, along with Tessella, Inc. of Newton, MA, on December 27, 2011.

Through the years, Fenestra has contributed to multiple patents on NARA’s Electronic Records Archives (ERA) System Architecture and Design.

Fenestra invents creative IT solutions to complex business problems. They are also working on a project with Westat.

In addition to digital archiving and long-term digital preservation, Fenestra’s areas of expertise include electronic questionnaires, questionnaire design and data collection, metadata and business process re-engineering. In recognition of their achievements as a government subcontractor, The U.S. Small Business Administration awarded Fenestra a 2010 Administrator's Award for Excellence.

For more information on Fenestra, visit http://www.fenestra.com,

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