Drop in Involuntary Part-Time Workforce Signals Better Opportunities Await 400,000 Workers Successfully Transitioned Out of Part-Time Employment in March

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Despite the negative commentary surrounding the April 2012 jobs report, one group—the involuntary part-time workforce—has reason to celebrate. For the first time since February 2009, the number of individuals in this group fell below 8 million—to 7.7 million. Those that remain employed only part-time should seize this news and renew their efforts to find full-time work, Certified Career Coach Hallie Crawford says.

"Those still stuck in part-time positions involuntarily should step up their efforts, because it’s obvious employers are ready to give them full-time employment,” Certified Career Coach Hallie Crawford says.

Despite the negative commentary surrounding the April 2012 jobs report, one group—the involuntary part-time workforce—has reason to celebrate. For the first time since February 2009, the number of individuals in this group fell below 8 million—to 7.7 million. Those that remain employed only part-time should seize this news and renew their efforts to find full-time work, Certified Career Coach Hallie Crawford says.

“I’ve been calling these workers ‘the forgotten 8 million,’ because they’re not included in the unemployment figures. Yet, most are suffering financial hardship due to their involuntary part-time status,” says Crawford. “Last month, 400,000 part-time workers likely succeeded in returning to full-time work. That’s an incredible and largely overlooked statistic. Those still stuck in part-time positions involuntarily should step up their efforts, because it’s obvious employers are ready to give them full-time employment.”

Crawford offers these tips for involuntary part-timers to help them find a full-time position with suitable skill requirements:

1.    Look where you are - consider professional development or mentoring classes to showcase yourself as an exceptional employee that deserves promotion to a full-time position when one becomes available.
2.    Consider part-time x2: Many workers find satisfaction and enjoy the variety offered by working two part-time jobs. Chosen carefully, the workers can use one job to gain or enhance skills that would bring advancement within the other.
3.    Update your resume to positively reflect your part-time work. Many companies view those willing to work part-time as go-getters with fresher skillsets than their out-of-work contemporaries.

Crawford also notes the irony in the April report. “We gained only 120,000 jobs in March, so there’s no doubt that the unemployed must work harder to find jobs this month than last. Nevertheless, for one group, the news was very, very good. It shows that persistence and motivation pay off when it comes to finding full-time employment.”

About Create Your Career Path
Since 2002 Create Your Career Path and their team of certified career coaches have helped job searchers nationwide identify their ideal career path, navigate their career transition and achieve their career goals. New college grads through mid-career professionals have used our career coaches to find their dream job. Create Your Career Path was founded by certified career coach, speaker and author Hallie Crawford. Crawford has served on the Board of the Georgia Coach Association, and is regularly featured as a career expert on CNN, Fox Business News, the Wall Street Journal, Yahoo HotJobs and Entrepreneur Magazine.

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Jennifer Koon
Michael Mackenzie Communications
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