DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on Study Showing Link Between Weather and Life Expectancy

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new health study showing a link between weather conditions and mortality rates in certain individuals.

doctorshealthpress.com reports on study showing link between weather and life expectancy

DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on Study Showing Link Between Weather and Life Expectancy

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that this environmental factor could result in thousands of additional deaths each year. This is the first study to consider the impact of climate changes on life expectancy.

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new health study showing a link between weather conditions and mortality rates in certain individuals.

As reported in Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin on Monday, April 16, 2012 (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/general-health-2/a-link-between-weather-and-life-expectancy-discovered), Harvard researchers have found that seemingly small changes in summer temperature swings — as little as one degree — may shorten life expectancies for medically ill older adults.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that this environmental factor could result in thousands of additional deaths each year. This is the first study to consider the impact of climate changes on life expectancy.

Though heat waves can be deadly, even minor temperature changes can be fatal to older adults with diabetes, heart failure, chronic lung disease, or past heart attacks.

Looking at the long-term health of 3.7 million chronically ill adults over 65, the Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports the study found that the years when the summer temperature swings were larger had higher death rates than years with smaller swings. Every one-degree (Celsius) increase in variability increased the death rate for this segment of the population by between 2.8% and four percent. Diabetics had the biggest risk at four percent. Researchers estimate that, every year, these summer temperature changes could be causing 10,000 deaths.

One positive note: the risk was lower for people who lived in cities with more green space.

The reasons behind this remain murky. It’s likely that older adults with chronic health problems not only can’t handle extreme heat well, but also are less resilient than others when it comes to bigger-than-usual temperature swings. People adapt to certain temperatures. But what we don’t adapt to very well are unexpected fluctuations in weather.

(SOURCE: Zanobetti, A., et al., "Summer Temperature Variability and Long-term Survival Among Elderly People with Chronic Disease," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online Apr. 9, 2012.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

The Doctors Health Press believes in the healing properties of various superfoods, like pistachios, as well as the benefits of taking vitamins and supplements, Chinese herbal remedies and homeopathy. To see a video outlining the Doctors Health Press' views on homeopathic healing, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/homeopathy.

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