SantaFe.com "Featured Business" Spanish Colonial Arts Society Holds Symposium Celebrating the Civilian Conversation Corps April 21

Share Article

The Symposium: Celebrating the CCC takes place from 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 p.m., Saturday, April 21, at the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, a SantaFe.com ‘"Featured Business." The symposium features scholars, conservators and curators discussing the role of the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) in preserving and reviving the traditional arts in New Mexico, and is a program of the exhibition New Deal Art: CCC Furniture and Tinwork.

SantaFe.com "Featured Business" Spanish Colonial Arts Society Holds Symposium Celebrating the Civilian Conversation Corps April 21

The Symposium: Celebrating the CCC takes place from 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 p.m., Saturday, April 21, at the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, a SantaFe.com ‘"Featured Business." The symposium features scholars, conservators and curators discussing the role of the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) in preserving and reviving the traditional arts in New Mexico, and is a program of the exhibition New Deal Art: CCC Furniture and Tinwork.

Symposium participants are:
Tey Marianna Nunn, PhD, Director of Visual Arts, National Hispanic Cultural Center, Albuquerque, author of Sin Nombre: Hispana and Hispano Artists of the New Deal Era

Bettina Raphael, Conservator, author of Conservation Survey of Tinware at Bandelier National Monument

William Wroth, PhD, Independent curator, Santa Fe, author of Russell Lee's FSA Photographs of Chamisal and Peñasco, New Mexico

Gary Roybal, Museum technician, Bandelier National Monument, discussant

Robin Farwell Gavin, Curator, MoSCA, moderator

The New Deal Art: CCC Furniture and Tinwork exhibit has been designated as a We the People project by the New Mexico Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The event is sponsored by the New Mexico Humanities Council, Bandelier National Monument, and the Spanish Colonial Arts Society.

This is a free event. Seating is limited, and reservations are required, so please call 505-982-2226 to reserve. For more information, call 505-982-2226 or visit SpanishColonial.org

About the Spanish Colonial Arts Society:
The Spanish Colonial Arts Society was founded in Santa Fe in 1925 by writer Mary Austin and artist/writer Frank G. Applegate. Its purpose was to preserve and perpetuate the Hispano art forms that have been produced in New Mexico and southern Colorado since the region was colonized by Spain in 1598. More than 86 years later, its mission has been accomplished and expanded. Through the preservation and exhibition of its Spanish Colonial art collections at the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, sponsorship of the semi-annual Spanish Market exhibitions and a range of outreach programs, the society is now a leader in the public education of traditional Spanish Colonial art and culture.

Since the first Spanish Market was held in 1926 showcasing 11 artists, the society has had a strong commitment to provide a meaningful venue for modern day Hispanic artists to exhibit and sell their work. The semi-annual Spanish Market provides such a showcase each July and December. Some 250 artists share their heritage and culture with the public, and collectors go home with remarkable one-of-a-kind art pieces that can be directly traced back to the Colonial period. The Traditional Spanish Market is the oldest and largest juried Spanish market in the United States. The artists must use traditional methods and materials to ensure the authenticity of each piece. The Youth Market is also featured at the summer market and it encourages young people aged 7 to 17 to learn about the traditional arts.

Several events surround the summer and winter markets and there is something for all our visitors to enjoy. In addition to the art displayed and sold at the markets, there is also traditional Hispanic music, food and dance. Each market is a celebration of Hispanic New Mexican heritage and culture.

The Spanish Colonial Arts Society collections were initiated in 1928. Today with 3,700 objects, the collections are the most comprehensive compilation of Spanish Colonial art of their kind. Dating from the Middle Ages to the New Millennium, the collections span centuries in art, place and time. Among the various media featured are santos (painted and sculpted images of saints,) textiles, tinwork, silverwork, gold work, ironwork, straw appliqué, ceramics, furniture, books and more. A host of comparative objects from Spain and Latin America as well as Asia, Bulgaria, France and other worldly locales further illustrate the faraway influences that converged during the Colonial era to inspire artists and art forms. All combined, the collections represent the artistic history and ongoing evolution of Hispano culture in New Mexico while firmly establishing its important place within the global arts landscape.

The Museum of Spanish Colonial Art is housed in a building that is part of the legacy of the acclaimed late architect John Gaw Meem. The building is a classic example of the Spanish Colonial or Pueblo Revival architectural style that Meem pioneered in New Mexico in the early 20th century. It also reflects Meem’s personal interest in the region’s Hispano culture and his longtime involvement with the Spanish Colonial Arts Society.

About SantaFe.com
SantaFe.com provides locals and visitors to Santa Fe alike the most current interactive platform for events, music, arts, business, dining and lifestyle. SantaFe.com is a division of Hutton Broadcasting, located at 2502 C. Camino Entrada, Santa Fe, NM 87507

Contact Information:
Scott Hutton
SantaFe.com / Hutton Broadcasting
http://www.santafe.com
(505) 471-1067 (Media inquiries only, please)

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Todd Eric Lovato
SantaFe.com
(505) 471-1067
Email >
Visit website